Chef knife upgrade - some opinions needed

6
10
Joined Jan 2, 2013
I thought this would be simple.. But so many choices.

Must Haves:

Wood Handle

Stainless

Around 9" for me and another smaller one for my wife

Pairing knife also.

Wood case for storage

I have a hand made maple butcher block cutting board Arkansas stone, but I am looking into diamond blocks also.

Cutting mostly fruits and vegetables.

Most of the meat we eat does not require cutting.

I have a good bread knife

What confuses me is the brands and styles.

I have always had the german style.

I am open to a Japanese knife with that handle style.
 
3,989
825
Joined Dec 18, 2010
What is confusing you, the breadth of choices or not being sure about the differences? Have you ever tried a J-knife? Are you willing to buy to find out if you like or are you in an area where you can try before you buy? This kind of question is asked 3 or 4 times each week, often with same or similar answers. Have you read any of the prior threads? More details will help people address your need.
 
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3,989
825
Joined Dec 18, 2010
P.S. Good for you to already have a decent cutting board and ARK stones!
 
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2,848
235
Joined Nov 15, 2012
Ark stones are great on the softer steels, I finish all my softer stainless knives on an Ark.  But when you hit 60RC and above, like many Japanese knives, you really want waterstones.  I have a carbon Opanel at about 61RC and the Arc does nothing much good for it.  Any imperfections on the Ark's edges will really reek havoc on the edge of a hard knife.  And they just cut too damn slow to deal reasonably well with harder steels.

Stones are no big deal though, a really great 1-6K combination waterstone stone will set you back just about $100, and perfectly adequate ones can be had for around $50.

You haven't told us what you want to spend.  As an idea, in a 9"very good can be had for <$150, significantly better can be had for <$250.

Also, some Japanes knives are very thin at the edge and have to be handled accordingly, ie: stay away from bones and other hard stuff; show good technique on the board, no twisting.

Looking at just some recent posts is a good idea.

Rick
 

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