Chef Jian Chit Ming's famous chicken: what's the recipe?

5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I stumbled upon that video which unfortunately does not come with a recipe or instructions, at least not in English. The chicken looks just like a peking duck but it's not roasted, it's just given a water bath and a whole lot of drying time... then whatever happens is cut off from the video and at 5:35 it looks like he's dousing the chicken with hot oil?

Then later when he cuts up the chicken to plate it, the skin looks thin, all fat rendered, and crispy, beautifully golden...

Anyone has any pointers?

Thanks!

 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,656
1,135
Joined Mar 29, 2002
I've seen recipes for both that do. And others that do not. The oil bath tends to be more restaurant reheating just before service in practice but even at home it is critical if you want the crackly skin.

I often broil instead as too much oil gives me indigestion.
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Ok thanks Phatch. Would you have a recipe that you would recommend, that, ideally, would mention the oil frying technique?

Still I can't understand how you'd end up with such crispy and very very thin skin as on the plating at the end of the video. I mean I've poached chicken before and the skin ended up very soft, pliable, and the same thickness as raw chicken, all the fat intact, I can't imagine how pouring a few ladles of hot oil would make it instantaneously crispy and render the fat like that?
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Awesome, thanks Chris. Unfortunately some of the video is edited... still very curious to hear what you come back with.
 
804
305
Joined Sep 17, 2018
I remember a food show somewhere showing where they blew air into the neck to stretch out the skin from the meat and then poured hot oil over the skin to crisp it that way. Almost like frying the skin away from the moist meat to promote crispiness.
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I remember a food show somewhere showing where they blew air into the neck to stretch out the skin from the meat and then poured hot oil over the skin to crisp it that way. Almost like frying the skin away from the moist meat to promote crispiness.
Sounds like Peking Duck?
 
4,280
1,167
Joined Dec 18, 2010
But I always thought that was water, not oils, poured on Peking Duck to tighten up the skin before they were slathered with sugar syrup and roasted.
 
804
305
Joined Sep 17, 2018
But I always thought that was water, not oils, poured on Peking Duck to tighten up the skin before they were slathered with sugar syrup and roasted.

You're probably correct, I've never made it so couldn't say one way or the other.
 
2,486
492
Joined Oct 9, 2008
Ok. Unfortunately, he's not Mister Talkative.

There are only a few bits of information here:

1. The chicken starts cold
2. After the first pour-fry, he then glazes with "hong soi" (more on this below)
3. He hangs it to dry. The sound gets bad there: it's either 5 hours or 5 days. I think probably hours.
4. At the end, another pour-fry.

"Hong soi" I heard as "red water" (hongshui, in Mandarin), so I asked a friend from Hong Kong to watch the video. Yup: red water. Which is ...? Unknown.

Based on a little menu scanning, I suspect that it's a dilute glaze of the sort used on Peking duck: maltose, red vinegar (e.g. Fujian type), Shaoxing wine.

Hope that helps!
 
3,267
1,157
Joined Jul 13, 2012
I've made Peking duck before and it's a heavily seasoned water bath for the first two ladlings. Same process for chicken I guess. You almost need another, empty fridge for hanging. I was lucky to have one at my disposal.
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Ok. Unfortunately, he's not Mister Talkative.

There are only a few bits of information here:

1. The chicken starts cold
2. After the first pour-fry, he then glazes with "hong soi" (more on this below)
3. He hangs it to dry. The sound gets bad there: it's either 5 hours or 5 days. I think probably hours.
4. At the end, another pour-fry.

"Hong soi" I heard as "red water" (hongshui, in Mandarin), so I asked a friend from Hong Kong to watch the video. Yup: red water. Which is ...? Unknown.

Based on a little menu scanning, I suspect that it's a dilute glaze of the sort used on Peking duck: maltose, red vinegar (e.g. Fujian type), Shaoxing wine.

Hope that helps!
So is what I thought of as oil the red water? When you say pour fry... it's actually water or oil? I can tell he's starting with water but at some point it looks like oil... but maybe that's the red water. In any case thanks a lot for your help!
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Oh really the first time it's oil? It looked just like water!! I'll have to watch the video again but right now my connection is so bad I an barely see anything... Thank you Chris!
 
Top Bottom