Cheeseball with Fish Sauce instead of Worcestershire sauce

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by phatch, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    I Just Like Food
    This recipe came through my news feed yesterday.

    The associated recipe is

    The talk about cheeseball's regionality was interesting. What prompts this post was that instead of Worcestershire sauce, the recipe called for Fish Sauce.  Allegedly, Worcestershire sauce was an attempt by British citizens to recreate Fish Sauce so it's a reasonable substitution. But with high quality fish sauce, you'll often have that aged Parmesan flavor of properly fermented protein. So it should be highly compatible. I look forward to giving this recipe a try. 
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
  2. foodpump


    Likes Received:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Actually, legend has it that Worcestershire is Indian in nature. A retired Army major came back to England from India where he gave the secret recipie of his favorite condiment to the local chemists (drugstore) to replicate. The chemists, Mssrs Lea &Perrins followed the recipie to the letter, and called the Major to pick it up. Major came by, tried it, spat it out, and walked away refusing to pay for anything. The sauce went into a closet for a few years and before L &P tossed it out during a spring cleaning, they thought they'd try it one last time. Aging was one of the secrets. After that, L&P started to mass produce it. A few years later the army Major showed up, demanding his cut of the sales. Mr. Perrins was reported to have told the Major:

    "There's a white coat hanging behind the door. Put it on m'lord, and we'll see what can be done".....

    Gawd, I wish I could think of snappy remarks like that...

    In any case Worcestershire's main ingredients are anchovies and tamarind. Says so right there on the label. Not your typical ingredients found in the English countryside.....
  3. kelvin


    Likes Received:
    At home cook
    Seems interesting and delicious. I am definitely going to have a try. :)
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    Professional Chef
    Used very sparingly I think it would be a great addition to a cheese ball, especially one that featured a lot of  harder, longer aged cheeses, like parm.  It would just reinforce that umani flavor, but the fishiness itself should be apparent if used sparingly.