Cheese tray procedures

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by anneke, Sep 5, 2003.

  1. anneke

    anneke

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    I work in a French restaurant. We have a lovely array of French cheeses on display for our guests. I'm just curious to know, for those of you who also serve cheese this way in your restaurants, how do maintain your tray? Do you individually wrap them every night? Or do you cover the tray with a damp cloth and store in the walk-in? How do you deal with cheeses that run all over your tray?
     
  2. mirepoix man

    mirepoix man

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    Bestto wrap then individually, since some flavours might transfer from strong to weak ones. and yes...I'm back in town!
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Anneke,

    A lot depends on what type of cheese your serving.

    Some do well with a loose wrap of parchment while others need to be protected from the air. I use lemon leaves as a base for some cheeses that are softer like triple creams and then warap them in parchment.also,are your cheeses pasturized? here in the states it's illigel (Ha ha) but this does matter on texture.I hate cold cheeses and advice you(but i'm sure you already know this) to temper your cheeses for at least an hour before displaying. Tightly wrapped cheeses foster mold (unlike blue vain cheeses)so I wrap harder cheeses loosely then cut off any oxidation.
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Another trick I heard about (not sure if it was on here or somewhere else), brush the cut sides of your harder cheeses with a little olive oil before storing. It is suppose to help against drying out. Beyond that I always break down a cheese tray at the end of the night and wrap each cheese individually in parchment.

    As for pasteurized cheese's my understanding is if the cheese is aged for less than 60 days it must be made from pasteurized milk, if aged for more than 60 days then the producer may use unpasteurized.