Chateaubriand??tournedos?

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by gus20, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. gus20

    gus20

    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    Hello, how are u, im a little confused, could u tell me how a "filet" or "lomo finoi " is divided? I have seen head , chateaubriand (325 g.), tournedos, and filet mignons,,, FRom a filet, i only can get 2 tournedos???? what are these cuts exactly? is it a cut or a size?? how many filets mignons or chateaubriands can i get ?? How is divided?
    Other question, i asked about what buttermilk was, but i yesterday i read in the "cooking profesional" from Wayne Gisslen, and it says buttermilk that is sold in the supermarkets is NOT buttermilk (the liquid after the caseine is separated) its says its liquid milk, so,,,,what is buttermilk for u in the supermarkets=? Thanks so much
    a hug

    Gustavo
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,711
    Likes Received:
    324
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    You're correct about the filet Gus. From the largest to the smallest, chateaubriand, tournedos, filet mignon, and then in America "tips." You can sometimes get three tournedos if the filet is above 2.5 kilos.

    I don't know about the buttermilk.
     
  3. 100folds

    100folds

    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    11
    True buttermilk is the low fat milk portion that remains after you churn butter or the milky stuff left over in clarified butter. Traditionally the milk or cream would have been fermented before churning and afterwards the buttermilk would continue to ferment and thicken like yogurt.
    After world war II because of the lack of buttermilk due to the war, a cultured buttermilk was used made from ordinary skim milk. Give skim milk the standard yogurt treatment, fermenting till it gels. It is cooled to stop the fermentation then agitated to produce this fine liquid we call buttermilk.
    The difference is flavor, proteins and fats involved and true buttermilk is more likely to spoil quicker due to its increase of proteins and emulsifiers like lecithin.