Charring peppers to remove the skin.

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Joined Jun 11, 2009
Was watching a daytime cooking show the other day and one of the chefs said you can't char them on an electric stove top. Been doing it for years. I just lay an inexpensive cake drying rack on the eye of the stove, turn it on nigh and let 'er rip. Pitch them in a plastic bag for 5 minutes. I really hate stripping the charred skin off and removing the seeds. A duh moment occurred to me one day. For a poblano, I cut off the end, deseed with a paring knife and then char the skin. I got tired years ago stuffing them so I layer them in a dish with whatever I want in them. Chile rellenos are too greasy for me anyway, so I use some rice, some cheese, and layer strips of the cleaned peppers and top with a sauce as the spirit hits me and I am happy.
 
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Second on the propane torch. Gets a quick char without cooking the pepper flesh as much as other methods.
 
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Joined Aug 31, 2012
I thread the peppers onto my rotisserie with a tray underneath and just leave them, the drop off when they are evenly scorched.
 
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Joined Feb 12, 2011
Though I prefer to char the peppers over a gas flame, or better yet, some lump charcoal in a chimney charcoal starter...

This is how I usually do it at home: cut down pepper vertically into 4 pieces, remove any seeds and the white bits. Pop em in the toaster oven, skin up, high broil until charred, paper bag, then slide the skin off. Easy peesy lemon squeezey!
 
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
For me the removal of the skin is one of the most annoying tasks in the world.  I cover and let sit, and yes, it's easier, but how to get and keep the little broken pieces of charred  black skin off the pepper?  How do you get rid of them?  They stick to my hands, to the dish, to the paper, to whatever they sit on while you peel them, and then stubbornly, inevitably, all stick back on the pepper again.  Aargh.  

  Some people here do it under running water, but it seems it would take away the flavor.  I love charred peppers, a little oil, a few slices of garlic, salt pepper and parsley - great dish for summer.  But peeling  - any suggestions? 
 
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Joined Aug 7, 2008
 I prefer to char peppers on a BGE or at least over charcoal but a gas flame works as well. I want to cook the peppers at least enough to soften the flesh a little so they are pliable. Once they are charred I rest them in a brown paper bag or at least covered so they steam for a few minutes and then the skins come right off. I clean near running water but never under running water. I just open the peppers with my hand and slide the flesh between my fingers. Then I rinse my hand and repeat.  It's a bit like cleaning shrimp. Once you get a system that works for you it's pretty easy but can be a little frustrating at first. I grow my own pablanos so in the fall I load up the BGE and smoke/char a big batch at a time and then freeze them. They hold very well.
 
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Joined Jan 4, 2011
WOW. 

I never really looked at this task as being such a big deal.  I guess I'm wrong.  I do it the old standard "flames from the top of the stove" way.  gungaSim, your pics are nice.  I don't leave as much red skin part as you.  Sparkie, your "toaster oven" way sounds like it should work well.  I think the "charcoal" method is a little overkill though.  I used to think that rinsing off the charred skin would effect the flavor.  I actually still do.  The reality though is that I haven't yet had a "test-taster" see any difference in the flavor.  As it is, the little black parts that don't get wiped off don't detract from the flavor but add to it, I'm told.  I do that same thing as DuckFat, rinsing my hands as I go.   I don't rinse the pepper. 
 
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
For me the removal of the skin is one of the most annoying tasks in the world.  I cover and let sit, and yes, it's easier, but how to get and keep the little broken pieces of charred  black skin off the pepper?  How do you get rid of them?  They stick to my hands, to the dish, to the paper, to whatever they sit on while you peel them, and then stubbornly, inevitably, all stick back on the pepper again.  Aargh.  

  Some people here do it under running water, but it seems it would take away the flavor.  I love charred peppers, a little oil, a few slices of garlic, salt pepper and parsley - great dish for summer.  But peeling  - any suggestions? 
Cut them in half, seed, trim rib, flip over using knife with the blade facing away from direction of travel scrape down length of pepper, rinse knife, wipe and scrape board, repeat.
 
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
Now why didn't  t think of either of those, CL and DF

next time i'll try.  I think that not liking the task i don;t do it often enough to have figured out a way.  This summer, lots of pepperoni arrosti!
 
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Joined Mar 19, 2009
Two methods i use to peel oven roasted peppers:

1. Tongs.

2. Rubber dotted gloves.

I like Sparsky's 1/4 idea. Will try it.
 
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Joined Feb 25, 2013
Yup. Sparkie''s technique sounds good, but I don't have a toaster oven(counter space at a premium), and cranking up the oven for one red pepper seems like overkill, and expensive. My broiler stinks, and sucks natural gas like a vacuum cleaner.

Anyone know what the gas expenditure is in oven roasting compared to stove top charring? For one or two units? At home? Commercial kitchens are another story.

Paper towels to remove skin, or rubber gloves with a garbage bag/ garbage can to flick skins/  water bowl nearby to rinse seems reasonable. I never use plastic bag, always paper. Either way you need something to rinse, wipe, or flick. Even if you use the back of a knife to scrape the skin. Whatever you use, it's a pain, and you have to live with it. It is what it is.

Also, I like that some of the flesh is roasted. That's what gives it the roasted flavor/ texture, IMO.
 
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Joined Apr 30, 2007
I place charred chiles in a paper bag for a minimum of 5 min., then rip the bag in half and use it to remove the skin, it keeps my fingers cleaner and I remove the skin faster. 
 
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Joined Jan 4, 2011
I'm curious as to why some people use plastic bags for steaming and some use paper bags. What difference does it make?    

TIA for your responses. 
 
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Plastic is easier to put a hand on than paper?  I let mine steam rest in a pot with a lid.
 
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