Char grill for semi-commercial kitchen at home?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by Ben Feng, Sep 18, 2018.

  1. Ben Feng

    Ben Feng

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    home cook
    Hey guys, need your advice.
    Planning a new house build and one of the most important rooms is the kitchen :)
    We do a lot of cooking and entertaining (generally fine-dining style, wide range of foods/cuisines, multiple plated courses, 20-30 guests at a time).

    Planned kitchen area is currently 7m long x 4.4m wide, but we can adjust this to whatever. See attached concept (ignore the colors).

    Planning on a commercial style cookline with:
    1. Induction cooktop 900mm
    2. Char grill, preferably lava rock, around 600-800mm wide – thinking something like a Baron 700 series or Mareno
    3. Electric griddle, around 400mm wide, preferably same brand as char grill
    4. Double deep-fryer (2x 5L). Was originally thinking a built-in freestanding unit, but no cheap and less flexible, so just tending towards a benchtop unit would be best.
    5. Rational XS combi ovens (we'll be using the one from our current house, but will likely add another - absolutely love it)

    All of the above, except the combis, will be in a cookline under a 5.7m rangehood canopy, 1200mm deep. Hoping to zone the canopy with multiple in-roof exhaust fans so I can turn on what sections I need and keep noise down.

    Thinking a bullet proof benchtop like Dekton for the cookline and island bench, and granite for the breakfast bar.

    Question for you (finally!) - I'm a bit scared about the char grill, having never used one inside, so not sure what to expect. Will we regret the smell, smoke, mess?

    Any other comments or recommendations on above, or on the layout/flow of the kitchen?

    Much appreciated!
     

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    drirene likes this.
  2. jimyra

    jimyra

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    Have your HVAC designed by an engineer. You will need make up air and fire suppression. Have fun.
     
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  3. halb

    halb

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    This is a US based forum. The problem with posters from other countries (and we have no clue where) is that we have no idea what your local codes and requirements are or what you will be allowed to do as far as commercial cooking equipment in a residence.

    So at best we can offer only superficial advice that may or may not be correct.
     
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  4. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    I agree with @halb. Without knowing where you're from and what zoning and code restrictions are in place, there's really no specific advice we can give.

    However, I have had an indoor char griller and they are a lot of work. Yes, you get the smell throughout the house and even the best exhaust systems will not prevent grease from getting everywhere. If it were me, I would save the money on the indoor char griller and build a nice outdoor set up. I grill all year round so, for me, its worth it.

    As for cleanup and maintenance, char grillers require a lot of work. Not only do you have to clean the surfaces, but, you also have to pull it apart periodically and give it a thorough cleaning or else you will likely have that "grill" smell in your house.

    But, the biggest issue that could come into play down the road is when you go to sell the house. They say the kitchen sells the house but, that can also work in the opposite direction. There aren't too many home buyers who are interested in a home kitchen with such an elaborate professional kitchen style set up. You could end up with a house that cost more to build than its value. If you plan on living there for the rest of your life, then, it doesn't matter. But, if there is any possibility the home will be for sale at some point, this elaborate kitchen could come back to haunt you.

    Good luck. :)
     
  5. Ben Feng

    Ben Feng

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    I'm from Australia. I'm still looking into it, but it appears the code restrictions aren't onerous.

    @sgsvirgil that's exactly the sort of info I'm after - if it's going to stink out the house and is a beggar to keep clean, I think you're right: I'd be best off having an outdoor setup just off the main kitchen somehow. I suppose what i'm trying to achieve is the ability to easily grill something quickly without having to transport stuff outside, and without the discomfort of weather conditions. However, the much high need for cleaning and the smell will likely far outweigh the convenience of having the grill inside...

    What about deep-fryers - have you had them inside? Do they stink out the place even if you have a decent extraction system? I've only ever used them outside.
     
  6. drirene

    drirene

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    You can invite me. I'm happy to travel. :)
    Good luck with your endeavor!
     
  7. halb

    halb

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    Fryers are OK. I always recommend that you have a good hood and ventilation system. As @jimyra mentions, in your case you should have it designed by a company that does hoods for restaurants. Oh, and there is no such thing as multiple fans. The practice is to use one variable speed fan.
     
  8. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    Yes, I own 2 portable deep fryers and I rarely use them inside, if ever. I built an outdoor grill setup a number of years ago made out of brick and stone. Its protected by roof and for all intents and purposes, its an outdoor kitchen that I use all year round. Whenever I use the fryers, I simply set them up on the outdoor counter space to avoid the smell of grease and oil spreading throughout the house. If I used the fryers more frequently, I would invest in a commercial fryer and add it to my outdoor setup.
    Deep frying indoors will always cause that greasy smell regardless of how good your vent system is. There really is no way around it. Not even the best, most expensive vent systems will completely eliminate the smell of grease and oil.
     
  9. halb

    halb

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    Yes, you will smell it but then most cooking is going to generate "aromas". I guess it's up to you as to what's objectionable and what's not. Good ventilation is key to how long it will last after you are done. If the cooking area is part of an open floor plan as is popular these days expect the odors to permeate the entire area if not the whole house. Confine the cooking to an area partitioned off from the rest of the house, equipped with self closing doors and negative pressure from a ventilation system, you won't stink up the whole house.