chanterelle problems

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by toddlove8845, Oct 12, 2005.

  1. toddlove8845

    toddlove8845

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    Do you think its woth it to buy imported chanterelle mushrooms or do you think the US are just as good?
    Ive had problems with water logged and just not great chanterelles imported from Frace.
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    If they're picked locally, go for them!
    Make sure you check them thoroughly IN FRONT of the picker, slicing them down the middle looking for little holes, etc. and pay the picker the negotiated price.
     
  3. plongeur

    plongeur

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    I work in a restaurant in France and the last box of 'French' chanterelles I worked on actually came from Russia...ditto cepes, giroles, pieds de mouton, trompettes des morts, you name it - mushrooms here now almost exclusively come from Eastern Europe where labour for picking is a LOT cheaper than it is in France or other Western European countries.
    So even if you're importing from a French importer, check the labels: there's a European law which allows them to put 'Conditioned in France' on the box - that means 'taken out of the big box from Russia and put into a smaller box in France'.
    Not that they're bad products, although likely to be dirtier than we find for French-picked produc. That can be some expensive dirt you end up buying.
     
  4. toddlove8845

    toddlove8845

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    Thanks for the heads up. I would never have considered that they would not be grow in France.
     
  5. plongeur

    plongeur

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    You need to read the labels carefully. EU law requires that the country of origin is *somewhere* on the box, so you get some GIANT stickers saying 'Conditioned in France' and the company name and adverts and so on, and then a tiny little sticker on the side or bottom saying 'Origine: Slovakie' or whatever. It may be that by the time that box arrives in the US that tiny little label has 'accidentally' fallen off.
    In any case, personally I'd go for local if it's in your budget range; I don't see that a chanterelle that's flown a few thousand miles from France is going to be better/fresher/tastier than something picked in the woods up the road.
    And you can always label them 'French-style chanterelles'!