Challenge October 2013 - Cabbage

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Haha I didn't see that one coming!  It's gonna be one smelly gassy month lol!  Just to be clear, are we talking brassica and cruciferous?  Is that the same family?
im wondering the same...i'm on holiday in New Orleans and experimenting with turnip greens for the first time...made a pie with sautéed potatoes,onions and turnip greens I'd like to submit
 
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So here is a list of a few of the options we have in this challenge, just to make it clear.
[h2]List Of Cruciferous Vegetables Including Brassica Vegetables[/h2]
Here's a list of cruciferous vegetables: the four species of Brassica (a genus in the Cruciferous family) and the other cruciferous vegetables.

Notice that broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage are the same species! They differ only in how they have been bred, and thus are classified as different cultivars.

Brassica oleracea
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Collard greens
Kohlrabi

Brassica rapa
Bok choy
Chinese cabbage (Napa cabbage)
Rapeseed oil (canola)
Rapini
Turnip

Brassica napus
Rutabaga

Brassica juncea
Mustard greens

Other cruciferous vegetables
Arugula (rocket)
Daikon radish
Horseradish
Maca
Radish
Virginia pepperweed
Wasabi
Watercress
try this one posted by miss kk, bug, it was also confirmed by butzy, our host this month
 
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Chris, I knew it!

You had to be the first one to come with brussels sprouts.

I haven't had them for years. Had to eat them as a kid, so I would quarter them and swallow them with water. Eventually I was excused :)

KK

What an interesting combination of ingredients!

Your picture looks fine to me!

And thanks for posting a list of the edible members of the brassica family /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif

Ordo,

i think I am going to credit the cauliflower garlic confit as a combined entry by you and Siduri /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

It looks very appetising!

And that daikon-beef spine soup, how original is that!

Like many others here, I have never cooked with beef spine, but obviously I have with oxtail (as some others have kindly pointed out is part of the spine)

You are on a roll here with your entries:

What batter do you use for your cauliflower tempura? And at what temperature do you fry it?

Brocoli-bacon-pasta: nothing can be bad if it has bacon /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif

FF

You cannot go wrong with coleslaw isn't it?

Especially with homemade mayo

K-girl:

The first kale entry!

We always only ate kale after the first frost had gone over it. Just mashed with potatoes and rookworst to the side. (yes I know, it sounds like the way we eat sauerkraut, traditional dutch food can be quite bland)

Dcarch

That looks so stunning!

Almost too pretty to eat.

I wish I could plate like that

Little side track to chili's:

Love them. I eat them fresh and if I got too many, I'll dry them.

I then sometimes use them for Thai red chili paste (after soaking), or I grind them into chili powder.

Haven't used them whole yet. Sounds like a plan as well!

K-girl:

That just looks like comfort food - deluxe!

Slayer:

I am looking forward to more of your entries.

So many dishes from your part of the world that I am totally unfamiliar with. Sauerkraut soup? I have only had sauerkraut mashed with potatoes as is traditional in the part of the world where I grew up (the Netherlands). Some people would put raisins and canned mandarin parts in it. I never liked that, prefered my sauerkraut with rookworst (smoked sausage)  and spek (bacon).

And I can just imagine cabbage rolls made with red cabbage! They gotta look beautiful!
 
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Alright I got a dish for ya'll later today, got the day off. Random sidenote: I saw at some restaurant they deep fry a whole cauliflower head in duck fat, so good. 
 
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Stir-fry some minced pork, season with rice wine, light and dark soy sauce and salt:


Mix with blanched and chopped cabbage, add sesame oil and black pepper:


Bring a cup of water to the boil, add some peanut oil and stir in 1 and a quarter cup of flour, knead the dough when cooled down, form it to a roll and cut it to pieces:

 

Flatten and fill:


Fold, steam and serve:

 
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I dedicate this dish to Chris. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif  

Coq au Vin with Glazed Onions, Sauteed Mushrooms, Sauteed Brussel Sprouts with Bacon

- Dice bacon and place in a cold pan with minced garlic. 

- Slowly render the fat until the bacon is caramelized. 

- Cut the stalk side of the sprouts and make an X in it with your knife (so it cooks faster and doesn't stay tough). 

- Add the raw brussel sprouts to the bacon fat and cook slowly. 


  
 
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Pickled okra, seared cauliflower, arugula fluid gel, radish sprouts, roasted long beans, smokey purple hull peas. Everything was really nice, except for the broken fluid gel /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crying.gif. I added some spinach to supplement the arugula I had, who knew that spinach breaks down gels? The inspiration for this one was Texas BBQ, but I wanted it to be vegetarian. I boiled the peas with some liquid smoke and it really pushed that Texas BBQ smokeyness. Pickles are a big part of BBQ here as well, and Okra is in season. I got these rather big Okra fully knowing it may be inedible. (the bigger the okra, there is a chance it's hard and woody) Luckily, the pickling process + cooking the ever living hell out of it remedied the situation. The radish sprouts brought a burst of spice, potent little suckers. The long beans and cauliflower brought tasty caramelized veg flavor. Overall very happy with it, I'll be breaking out another dish tomorrow. 
 
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Are those 10" okras or what? I don't think I've ever seen an okra be longer than 2 or 3 inches before! 
Yea I try not to plate too stuffy, sometimes I will get a little more symmetrical though. 

Oh, you haven't seen anything. 


Okra is really amazing. When they get to around 4-5 inches, that is the perfect time to harvest them. Within like 2 hours of being perfect they go to being inedible and huge, like the one in the picture haha. I used to work at a restaurant that had a garden, it was amazing to watch. 
 

phatch

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We grew okra the first time this year. It didn't really come on at once so we ended up freezing the pods until there was enough to feed us. 3 inches was the common size, but there were some that went 6-7 before we found them under the leaves. They get a little seedy at that size imho. 
 
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Namasu, a Japanese salad of pickled vegetables, very refreshing on a plate lunch.

I make this dish alot here in Arizona to remind us of home.

Super easy, slice-

Cucumbers

Carrots

Sweet white onions

Daikon

add rice vinegar, sugar, ginger root, salt and water, cover and refrigerate for the day


Drain and serve with shoyu chicken (also easy-chicken poached in soy sauce, beer, water, garlic and ginger), rice and steamed baby bok choy
 
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Namasu, a Japanese salad of pickled vegetables, very refreshing on a plate lunch.

I make this dish alot here in Arizona to remind us of home.

Super easy, slice-

Cucumbers

Carrots

Sweet white onions

Daikon

add rice vinegar, sugar, ginger root, salt and water, cover and refrigerate for the day
K-girl, thanks a lot for sharing this super easy recipe. One of the dishes we make on a regular basis here is philipino chicken adobo and it looks a lot like your Shoyu chicken (but no beer: soy sauce, vinegar, LOTS of garlic (I usuually put a whole head), bay leaves, black pepper. And of course I typically serve it with white rice and pan-steamed bok choy. I believe those pickled vegetables would go well with it - I'll have to give it a try. 
 
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FF, the namasu works beautifully with the richness of the chicken.  I LOVE chicken or pork adobo, very similar to the Portuguese Vinha d'alhos… oh man, I haven’t made either dish for the longest time. 
 
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Can't have a cabbage challenge without Kimchi!

Napa cabbages fresh from garden:


Shredded and salted, left overnight in the fridge and drained. Julienned carrots, spring onions, sugar, garlic, ginger, dried chilis, soy sauce and fish sauce to go with it:


Mix well and place into the fermenting pot:


What comes out of it shall be reported in two weeks.

 
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Choucroute my way (Sauerkraut in German money)

This yesterday's dish is inspired on "choucroute garnie", except I have only 2 mouths to feed, including mine. The other mouth doesn't like choucroute, so it's all going to be a lot less than the original. Also, if you use sauerkraut and don't like the first syllables of that, which is "sauer" -meaning acidic- then you might like this. I don't like the "sauer" bit either in sauerkraut.

Nowadays you will find choucroute canned or vacuum packed. Both will work. I used just one 500 gram (1lb) vacuum packed choucroute. Normally you would  have meats in it like; ham hock, pork shoulder, salted pork belly, saucisses à cuire, Frankfurter sausages. I used fresh slices of pork belly, artisanal sausages to be panfried, pork cutlet. I also got rid of the Riesling wine which can be very acidic and used a nice white Côte du Rhône instead. Juniper berries, cloves and bay leaf are essential.

To make a long story short; it's a matter of building a few layers as you can see, then cover and put in the oven for 1,5 hours, add potatoes, another 45 minutes in the oven, et voilà... no harsh acidity and just right for the other mouth to have tasted more than I anticipated.

First, put the choucroute in a sieve to drain. Then squeeze gently to remove most of the remaining liquid!!!

Building the layers1. a little sweated onion and garlic, then choucroute, s&p. 2. Raw carrot, half an onion with 3 cloves in it, bay leaf, 4 juniper berries, pork cutlet (better to use cuts of shoulder part). 3. Cover with choucroute, s&p and the rest of the sweated onion and garlic 4. Add pork belly. 5. Pour 150 ml of wine and 75 ml of water over it. And cover.

Cook for 90 minutes (at least 60 minutes longer if you use a whole small precooked ham hock). Add unpeeled potatoes, cover and cook for another 45 minutes. Bon appétit!

   
 
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