Challenge July 2013 - Pork

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by ordo, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. ordo

    ordo

    Messages:
    2,462
    Likes Received:
    251
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Thanks Petals. Unsurpassable host!

    −Oh, for a month I'll be the King!

    −¿The King?

    − Certainly.

    −The King of what Kingdom?

    −Not of a Kingdom.

    −Then, the King of what?

    −The King of the Feast of Fools!

                              Pork


    Any single part of the pork, in any way you want to cook it, in any culinary cuisine. Grilled, roasted, spit roasted, broiled, braised, steamed, stir fried....Shoot some picks if you can. It helps. Above all: have fun!

     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  2. butzy

    butzy

    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    397
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Good one, Ordo!!!

    And congratulations on winning the June challenge.

    Here's the first entry:


    I am cheating a bit here as this was done some time ago.

    Next one will be in November, so too late for this challenge
     
  3. pollopicu

    pollopicu

    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    53
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    haha, bendito..


    Good one. Love pork.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  4. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    46
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Oh, no!  Will we have to eat Miss Piggy?
     
  5. pollopicu

    pollopicu

    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    53
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    No, Miss Piggy will eat you. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
     
  6. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I changed my avatar to the one I used a long time ago, just to get in the mood.

    It's a representation of a few hobbies; pork, knives and something else, it's on the tip of my tongue, wait, almost, no, well, I'll get back to you when I find that third one...
     
  7. teamfat

    teamfat

    Messages:
    4,019
    Likes Received:
    432
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Cool!  I dallied about too long to get an entry in for pasta, I'll try not to make the same mistake this time.  I mentioned that if I ever got the chance to choose fennel is on the short list.  One other option was pork shoulder, more specific but still very versatile.

    Now, what to do - maybe combine the last few challenges and do a pig liver ravioli ...

    mjb.
     
  8. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    101
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Oh this will be fun....

    So here is my first entry , something very tradition of my country.

    Feijoada de carne de porco

    In English: Black bean and pork stew

    This is tradition accompanied with white rice and farofa ( a flakey side made of cornmeal or a potato based flour , some pork as well , sometimes carrots , raisins , and chicken hearts )

    Its correct to let the beans and pork meat you will be using soak in water for 12-36 hours ( depends on the person , and recipe being used ) while changing the water various times through out the wait period. 

    Obviously i cheated a bit since i cant stay 36 hours in a restaurant with no shower , or TV XD 

    The beans soaked over night for around 15 hours.....

    Made this by first cooking the beans in a pressure cooker till they are al dente ( usually still having a bite to them , but not too hard ) Once the beans have cooked ( usually takes 30 minutes , release pressure and add more water and some bay leaves to cook for another 15 minutes start counting once the pressure cooker starts peeping  ) separate them for later. Heat up oil and throw in some bacon till it was pretty well cooked. Let the fat cook down , remove the bacon and added in 50 grams pig ears cooked them down as well and threw in some pork sausage ( calabresa e linguiça ) let them cook down and threw in the cooked bacon once again , added in about 2 chopped onions to the mix  , 5 crushes garlic cloves as well. Once everything has been cooked you add the black beans , if necessary add more water as well. Let them boil until everything is evenly cooked and a broth is thick. Salt to taste. 

    The pork ears usually allow the broth to get creamier if you will , because of the fat on them. 

    The end result is pretty good if i do say so myself. 

    Also do this when you have alot of spare time , and cook the meat in a large pot...... obviously XD 

    I have loved feijoada since i was a kid back in the U.S and ever since i came back to brazil i couldnt resist eating this. 

    Here in Brazil meat is important , so much that i stopped being a vegetarian after 5 years XD , but i still prefer veggies over meat any day. 

    SO HERES A PIC AFTER ALL THIS BLABBERING

    Feijoada de porco ( served in a stone pot ) 

     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  9. jake t buds

    jake t buds

    Messages:
    857
    Likes Received:
    77
    Exp:
    Other
    In gelatin. 
     
  10. timanator

    timanator

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Kaique

    What type of beans are you using in that dish?

    Thanks.
     
  11. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    101
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Black beans ( Black turtle bean ) for some people....

    Pretty typical in latin american cuisine 
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
  12. pollopicu

    pollopicu

    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    53
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    This entry doesn't count because I made it a few years ago. (circa way before the new temperature guidelines for pork) but in the spirit of participating in this challenge I'd like to share this roast pork loin dish I made that was really good.

    Barbecue-rubbed pork loin with raisin mustard-chutney





    I actually got the recipe from cooking light magazine back when I was starting to become a health nut.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
    colleens likes this.
  13. ordo

    ordo

    Messages:
    2,462
    Likes Received:
    251
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    @Butzy: i just want to be there! What a great roasted pork.

    @Kaike: a stupendous recipe. I eat Feijoada while working in Brazil some years ago. Home made feijoada is incomparable better that resto feijoada. Quite a nutritious dish from humble origins. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    @Pollo: that's amazing. How in hell did you get such heavenly crust? 

    Ok. My first entry. I bought this cut, from the neck (no bones) we call Bondiola. It seems to be the lower part of the neck, rich in fat and perfect for slow braising. This is about 1.5 kilos.


    I S&Ped generously and braised it with a mix of mustard, honey, stout beer and balsamic. In fact it was a papillote and the oven was at about 150°C for 4 hours.. Once done, i cut slices and pan caramelized it with the remaining of the mix. The salad is Akusay.


    Keep it going folks.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
  14. genemachine

    genemachine

    Messages:
    1,423
    Likes Received:
    123
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Now I have to get a pig's head... Well, this came right in time - Got a shoulder in the brine right now, ready to smoke today. Pictures later :)
     
  15. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    46
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Actually, ordo, the neck steaks are great grilled.  I always shied away from them because they didn;t seem as nice as pork chops, but the butcher told me to taste them, and they were exceptional.  I pound a little black and pink peppercorns and some coriander seeds, with salt, and put on the grill (if i can get someone to light the coals, then the barbecue, but i'm hopeless at lighting fires.  If not, on one of those heavy pans with ridges.
     
  16. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Pork in a sauce "Cross & Blackwell"

    I have to mention that these pictures date from exactly a year ago. They are a variation on what ordo and Siduri just posted. We call these cuts "spiering koteletten" and I believe in French you have to ask for échine de porc. This is a 1 cm thick slice from that meat that is very popular around here too for its excellent taste and above all it is much more juicy than regular pork chops and... a lot cheaper. So this escalope is simply panfried.

    I don't remember the name of the beans in english. We call them "snijbonen" which means litterally "beans to be cut", pointing at the preparation method; cut, blanche, then warm in butter in which you sweated an onion + s&p and nutmegg. BTW, pork and nutmegg is a delicious combo!

    The Cross and Blackwell sauce is a classic served with pork and easy to make. In the same pan in which the meat is fried, sweat a shallot, deglaze the pan with a dash of white wine, let evaporate the alcohol, add a little stock (veal, chicken..), reduce, add cream, let thicken a little, add a generous spoonful of chunky tangy (no sweet & sour!)  piccallily and let warm through.

     
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
    colleens likes this.
  17. wildchef

    wildchef

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Smoked first with dry rub, them grilled with sweet sauce.

     
  18. pollopicu

    pollopicu

    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    53
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Ordo, I've never heard of pork en papillote. I've only used the method for fish, but it makes sense when you think about it, especially with pork.

    Chris, your pork and sauce looks divine.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
  19. mike9

    mike9

    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    392
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I guess it's time to take that pork belly out of the freezer. 
     
  20. ordo

    ordo

    Messages:
    2,462
    Likes Received:
    251
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    @Chris: I guess they are named Flat Beans (though my English is not trustable at all). Great slice of pork you presented, and as always, enviable picks. That knife you have there is to die for.

    @WildChef: I wonder how you guys get that rich, beautiful color on ribs. Nice.

    Tip about picks: if you see a little hand on a pick, you can click on it and see the bigger version.