Ceramic knives...

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10
Joined Mar 21, 2002
I know absolutely nothing of cermaic knives.

I would greatly appreciate the advice of anyone who has used one.

Mainly, I wish to know the difference between a ceramic blade and a steel blade such as a Wustoff.

I am confused about the composure of the ceramic blade, is it still metal? - Or is it completely ceramic like a pot for a plant?

I was told ceramic blades are sharper, and stay sharper longer.

If so... why is this true?

I realize this is for personal use, and should not be used for industrial purposes... the cost alone for a ceramic knife explains that much to me.

In any event, is it worth it?

Or should I simply purchase a steel blade such as a Wustoff?


-Thank you-


:chef:
 
7,375
69
Joined Aug 11, 2000
All ceramic
The blades only go up to 6"......I absolutely love it!!! But it is just one knife, day in day out I use my Heinkel boning knife.
 
16
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Joined Mar 21, 2002
If I am not mistaken, isn't ceramic brittle?

Woud the knife break if dropped to the ground?

Also, is honing the ceramic blade any different than a steel?

Personally, the three main knives I use are serrated, paring and chef.

I haven't found much use for any other knives.
:chef:
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
The knives do not need to be sharpened. Ceramic is a very hard substance, harder than the steel used to make knives, so it's edge does not dull, until after years of use. It also makes a ceramic knife very brittle. Yes it will shatter if you drop it. I have had one for about 3 years now, and it is as sharp as when I first got it. I would never replace my good old steel knives with ceramic, but it does have its uses. Great for slicing thinly.
 
846
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Joined Nov 29, 2001
Ceramic knives are a wonderful novelty but there are far too many caveats for them to be used as a replacement for a steel knife.

* You have to send them out to be sharpened...When I think of how many times I sharpen my knives, a ceramic knife would spend more time at the post office than being used in my home. I understand they hold an edge but the inability to sharpen as needed counts them out for me.

* They break...If you drop one (and who's been known to never drop a knife, no matter how horrified you become when you do it) you have to pray while it's on the way down that it doesn't break.

* Where the heck do you store one?...You can't slap them on a magnet bar (which is where I store my cooking knives).

I had to get over the "different" look of Globals but their applications to both the home and professional kitchen helps you along in this endeavor. Ceramic knives simply have too many strikes against them for me to ever consider owning one.
 
48
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Joined Dec 1, 2001
I know someone who has a ceramic knife and they seem to like it. However, all that they do with it is simple cutting tasks.
It has stayed sharp, and that is the only good thing about it in my opinion.
If I were using it, I would be afraid I'd break it the first time that I small a clove of garlic with the side of the knife, which I often do with my Messermeister and Wusthof knives. They definately look, feel, and for most practical purposes are fragile. Plus you cannot sharpen them yourself.
The other thing I do not like about them is that they only come up to 6". Personally I like using a 10" knife or at least an 8" because it is easier to facilitate a rocking motion in traditional cutting techniques.

The one thing that I think is good about ceramic knives, is they are not a bad option for people that don't take care of their cutlery. Some people never sharpen or steel their traditional knives and put them thruough the dishwasher, going against what the manufacturers suggest. Ceramic is very easy to care for, just wash it after you are done using it and thats it.
 
846
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Joined Nov 29, 2001
The smashing of the garlic popped into my head after I made my post! :bounce: How about cleaving bones? You can do this with a steel knife but would destroy a ceramic. I wouldn't do it with my Global because they're more for detailed cutting/slicing but what would happen if you grabbed a ceramic by mistake?

I have gotten used to a 10" knife, which my cooking teachers claim is "for a man's hand...but it's a man's world..." Well, I don't particularly agree with that, seeing as I have the hands of an Amazon and as for it being a man's world...ROFLMAO!! In any case, my 10" knives suit me fine for heavy duty jobs and I probably wouldn't have much use for a ceramic knife.
 
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Joined Aug 4, 2000
Personally, I'm a staunch stalwort for old Sabatier knives which I still purchase from ebay. Just recently I got a 20 year old (or so) brand new 9 inch Sabatier carbon steel chef's knife for $60! That's where I'd go to find the quality Sabatiers.
 
16
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Joined Mar 21, 2002
Thank you all very much for the wisdom and experiences you have shared with me.

Personally, outside the restaurant, I do not find myself cooking things that would require the butchering of meats, or heavy impact to the blade.

The ceramic seems like a neat novelty to own, I will more than likely purchase one.

I do of course still have my steel blades as well, and was not wanting to replace them with the ceramic... I was just curious about all the things I have heard about them.

:chef:
 
16
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Joined Mar 21, 2002
I know what I will do!

First, I will purchase a ceramic paring knife and see how well I am impressed. If I am indeed impressed, then I will pay the money for the 6 inch.

The link was wonderful Foodie Jeff, very informative, thank you.

~Peace Out~

:chef: -~
 
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Joined Nov 10, 2001
Let us know how you like your ceramic knife Ronin. I will have to admit that I was intrigued with the knives the first time I saw Ming Tsai using them on the Food TV.

Ming and Kyocera teamed up to produce "Ming's Signature Series" of these knives. You can see them here: Ming's Signature Series Ceramic Knives

Watch your fingers. ;)
 
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Joined Apr 19, 2001
Kyle - I've worked classes with Norman, and taken his 'Chinatown tour' isn't he great!!!

Re the 10" knives - ahem - I'm a 4'11" lady, and I love my 10"! It can't be beat for large veg like cabbage and squash.

I have a ceramic peeler that I adore, from PCD; light as a feather, really does the job well. I don't think I'd go for the knives, for all the reasons listed above.
 
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Joined Mar 26, 2002
I bought a ceramic knife when I went to Japan 3 years ago. I love using that knife when cutting veggies. It's so light and sharp. And I'm amazed that US sells ceramic knives now. Of course, it's still cheaper to get it in Japan than here. So whenever you get a chance to visit Japan, pick up a ceramic knife as a souvenir :p
 
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Joined Mar 26, 2002
marmalady - Well, I don't know about now since all the security is so tight in airports, but I managed to bring it back fine 3 years ago.
 

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