Ceramic knives in the kitchen?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by mustaroad, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. mustaroad

    mustaroad

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    Hey , Pantry cook Nick here (it's my first day). I've been butchering the seared ahi sashimi with both bread and 'pressed' chef's knife and decided to get a ceramic utility knife for the job. I went cheap cause it'll be borrowed and or broken soon for sure $18.

    I've never used one of these except for the quick trial at some kitchen store in the mall...

    Do thee things chip – break very easily? Will it be ok in my bag getting tossed around with the other wooden and steel tools?

    I already bought it, but was wondering how these things hold up in the kitchen.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  2. davehriver

    davehriver

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    My experience with ceramic knives is that the cheap ones are not as sharp as I can make even a cheap steel knife, but they retain the level of sharpness they have for along time.  If I was carrying in a bag with otherr tools I lould wrap it in cardboard or stiff plastic, they do break easily. I believe and hope that  all of your knives have something protecting the edges in that bag.
     
  3. mrmexico25

    mrmexico25

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    From my experience ceramic knives can be very shard, and great for just about anything BUT they are very fragile.  You drop it, it's done.  I recommend to buy cheap ones if you want to buy ceramic at all, they're just not reliable. 
     
  4. blueicus

    blueicus

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    I don't use ceramic knives since I have a bad tendency to drop them and looking at the people who've used them I have to say that you need to be very careful with them since they do chip and break relatively.  Same goes with ceramic steels, my chef lost two of them in quick secession because of droppage.
     
  5. just jim

    just jim

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    Agree with all above but would add: don't lend it.
     
  6. mustaroad

    mustaroad

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    I wouldn't lend, but the sous' like; Hey Nick! lemme see your knife. I want to tell him off, but he's  my boss... also knife guards in a bag are overrated, they're just a 10 second delay from each use. knife guard for the ceramic seems alright though. I'm excited about slicing to perfection.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Tried one at a restaurant show. Extremely sharp and expensive for an 8 inch french knife. I asked guy how do you sharpen he said I dont have to but if I do mail to them? I asked him about using a steel he told me it would cut a steel ? Very fragile and bad balance, but pretty. Needless to say I opted out, stick with my tried and true Forschners.and Wustophs
     
  8. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I have one ceramic that I love, especially when it comes to paper thin slicing, but I would have never taken it into a professional kitchen.  It would have been history very quickly and "good" ceramic knives are not cheap.  I use mine for home cooking and would take it with me if I was doing demos, but never into the restauant kitchens.
     
  9. mustaroad

    mustaroad

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    What would you suggest for slicing a 5oz strip of seared  Ahi sashemi?

    I vote for $18 ceramic. How many can I put you down for?
     
  10. davehriver

    davehriver

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    I would like to know what brand/model this knife if you believe it is sharp enough to do what you want.  Personally I would use my 10" chefs to cut that tuna.  It is shaveable sharp and I can move through a lot of product quickly with control.  I am not a real fan of "utility knives" in the kitchen
     
  11. chef torrie

    chef torrie

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    Put me down for zero. I'll stick to my chefs knife. Cuts just as well as any ceramic. There is a reason many do not use ceramic. Also a reason quality knife companies have been around since the 1800s. To each his own though. 
     
  12. mustaroad

    mustaroad

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    Oh, are the $28 ones as sharp as the $200 ones? I figured the expensive ones just looked cooler.

    The tech for fine sharpened ceramic is rather new and ceramic kitchen knives are even newer. The Kyocera blades are like $28 base, i don't remember the one I tried to order for $18. But all it is is a step past the santoku which some (many?) people use despite its fragility. I heard that the ceramic knives are sharper than any steel, so having one ready for specialty prep (like thin slicing seared ahi) could be my way to step up the cleanliness of my cuts on the line. I've seen Ahi tuna salads go out with well mashed chunks sawed with a dull bread knife so hey, why not step it up and show off some pristine slices? Could my 10" bottom shelf pressed steel do this job? Not if I sharpened it all night long. Perhaps a professionally sharpened tempered blade, definitely a santoku. But I'd like to be the talk of the town, kitchen rather, with the only ceramic knife. Impress your girlfriend, impress you're wife, you know the shebang. Buy that knife everybody's talking about.
     
  13. naia

    naia

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    I bought one ceramic knife and have been using for a while. I am just loving it a lot. I bought from cerablades.com. I think the quality is really nice for the price. 
     
  14. stevex

    stevex

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    I think you can find a good quality ceramic knife at a good price if you do your research. I stumbled upon a really cool set. My mate who used to work for James Martin got a sample to test. Everyone in the kitchen (including the head chef who has written a review) were impressed. The make is Feinzer. Their website has a section with the reviews (press) and also one which thoroughly describes usage, advantages and care of the knives which made me decide to buy them. They were also on discount so double win!
     
  15. jazzy765

    jazzy765

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    Im glad I read this before going out and purchasing one.
     
  16. cheftimothyj

    cheftimothyj

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    I have a ceramic chefs knife that I use at home.  Love Love Love it.  Very sharp, have had it for about 2 years and its just as sharp as the day I took it out of the box.  I never use it at work however because of how brittle the blade is.
     
  17. michaelga

    michaelga

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    The sharpest blade on the planet is supposedly a hand 'napped flint slicer.  

    Dozens of times more sharp than the best surgeons scalpel available.

    They are extremely expensive to get unless you have the skill to make them  yourself.

    They aren't very practical for most everyday use though....

    .... might explain why you don't see them very often.

    They are also fragile, unavailable in longer lengths, have limited handle choices, can't easily be re-sharpened, have tips that fall off if even looked at, and are darn expensive.

    Learn to sharpen and then buy a modest but decent knife - you'll be much happier.

    (or learn to nap)
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  18. daved

    daved

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    I just recently bought a Dalstrong Infinity blade off of Amazon.   It's a ceramic blade, 8" came with a sheath AND a diamond dust sharpener which is awesome.  Overall super happy with it and would recommend it highly.  Only thing is you do have to be delicate with ceramic, at least more so than steel which is obviously softer.