CCK Cleaver KF 1303 versus Wok Shop's Vegetable Cleaver

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by kokopuffs, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    The biggest difference I notice is that one is available and the other is out-of-stock.
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    8DDDDDDDD   and they both look alike!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  4. denverveggienut

    denverveggienut

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    I have both the CCK and the wokshop cleaver. Note that just because they're both "carbon steel" doesn't mean that the steel necessarily the the same! Carbon steel can vary in alloying elements, heat treatment, purity, hardness etc. That being said, I haven't sharpened the wokshop cleaver or used it a whole bunch, since I bought it to leave at my parents' place for my use when I visit. So, I can't say about the steel. 

    The CCK is a much better finished knife, though. The wokshop cleaver has a lot more rough edges. The bent part of the tang, for example, where it exits the handle on the wokshop cleaver, sticks out farther and is a lot more-square. The wood on the handle also seems different between the two knives. The CCK is a hunk of wood; it seems to be happy with a little bit of sanding and applications of mineral oil. The wokshop cleaver handle, on the other hand, seems to be made out of some sort of composite or laminate. Whatever it is, it just doesn't seem to be the same stuff or as nice. 

    Size and shape and weight are very close between the two cleavers. I measure the CCK at 214 x 90mm and 268 grams; wokshop 210 x 89mm and 266 grams.

    To sum up, I LOVE the CCK cleaver. It is one of my favorite knives, maybe my favorite one. I use it a lot. At $40, it is a great deal. Easy to sharpen, cuts great, nice profile, pretty reactive steel, but so what? The wokshop cleaver is well worth the $18 ($10 plus $8 shipping), but I'd say the CCK is worth the extra $22 if $40 doesn't sound like too much to spend.
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Thanks, DVN, and at this point I'd like to hear more about sharpening Wok's veggie cleaver to get a final opinion.  Thanks much for your experience.  Really.
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Please give me a comparison of the thickness of their spines.  How thick are each one at the spine?
     
  7. jake t bud

    jake t bud

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    What is the allure in using this thing to prep vegetables? Especially if you've got a chef's knife or a gyoto? What makes it better?
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Less work involved with a cleaver as opposed to a blade with a built-in camber.  To chop, the cleaver drops straight down whereas the camber requires some articulation at the wrist to complete the cut.  And really it makes a difference when chopping several bowls of veggies and I understand your concern.

    Chiro, here.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2013
  9. jake t bud

    jake t bud

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    Every veg I chop requires a different technique depending on the desired result. I drop down when slicing onions for example, but I can't see how this blade would make a difference. I've done hotel pans full of onions with a chef's knife and wonder how this would make it any easier. I can see if you were doing specific tasks, but then why add another knife when the chef's knife can do the same thing? Reviews I've read say this thing is indispensable, or replaced their existing chef's knife. Really?

    Since I like knives in general, I'd consider this but can't really justify it like I can a nice Japanese blade that makes me giggle every time I hold it. Even if it is only $40.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Information junkie here.  I want as much information as I can get before making an unnecessary purchase!
     
  11. denverveggienut

    denverveggienut

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    The CCK spine is 1.9 mm near the handle, with a slight distal taper. The wokshop is pretty close to that- I don't have it to hand to measure. Can't be much different.
     
  12. macmiddlebrooks

    macmiddlebrooks

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    Please buy one. It totally changed the way I approach veg. prep at work and when I show other cooks what it can do, you can see their eyes light up and they almost always pick one up for themselves. At the very least, they get a cheap Kiwi that roughly approximates the functionality of a CCK. On a side note:

    The CCK strongly benefits from having the spine and choil areas rounded for the utmost comfort for long prep sessions.

    If you have the scratch, get it re-handled or buy it already re-handled at CKTG. The stock handle is serviceable but, by no means, ideal 

    (if long-term comfort is important to you) or very attractive (if looks concern you).

    The CCK 1303 is easily the best value in a kitchen cutlery tool on the planet...period. I have spent literally thousands of dollars on kitchen knives over the years, but nothing has blown me away like this humble cleaver. 
     
    vic7012y likes this.
  13. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Please give some examples.
     
  14. macmiddlebrooks

    macmiddlebrooks

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    Of what, specifically? Why it's the best prep tool for veg.? It's very thin.... allover and more importantly, behind the edge. It's not too big, not too small (for most people). It's carbon, takes a super fine edge very quickly (honeing or sharpening) and keeps it for a respectable amount of time. And.....it's $40. I have a $500 custom Ashi Hamono that looks great, but can't quite beat the 1303 in pure performance. Again, it's just awesome to use.
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    My sharpening system includes the Norton Tri Hone with coarse and medium crystolon and fine india.  My finishing stones are a Halls Soft/Black Combination (WSB128W).  Sufficient?
     
  16. macmiddlebrooks

    macmiddlebrooks

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    Sufficient?...probably.

    Myself, and most here, are more fond of japanese waterstones.....but if your stones are not too "dished", I bet you'll be fine. 
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Hardly used but for maybe three times or so, especially the hard ones, india and harder.  And sharpening a cleaver style blade requires a different approach.
     
  18. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Mac, 

    It's not easy to dish an India or an Arkansas in a home environment.  In a carpentry shop, yes, sure.  In a home kitchen -- you might see slight signs after five years.  

    Koko,

    Your oil stones are not only adequate for the type of steel used to make CCKs, you'll probably end up with a better edge than you would with water stones.  A black Ark finish makes for a particularly durable edge on soft, tough alloys.     

    Whether you ultimately like a Chinese knife or not, you can afford the minimal investment in a CCK just to give it a whirl.  You spend more than $40 taking people you don't like out to lunch for heaven's sake.  More personally, even though a Chinese knife didn't work for me, I'm glad I at least tried it for a few weeks.  I'll go to my grave knowing it was a piece of junk, and you'll still be wondering.  So there.  

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2013
  19. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    BDL: would you care to sell me your CCK 1303?  PM me if you do.
     
  20. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    I'd sell you mine in a flash if I had one, but don't.  I bought a carbon Dexter Green River 20 years ago, which would have been nice if I liked it, but... no.  Anyway, that's long gone. 

    Quit agonizing my brother.  Make Mark Richmond a billionaire and buy a new one. 

    BDL