Cayenne pepper from Kroger compared with Penzeys

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kokopuffs, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I ran out of Penzeys cayanne and got some from Kroger.  Hmmm, Kroger's has about four time the heat as the stuff from Penzeys and my latest batch of jerky, seasoned with cayenne, I had to give it away.    Way way way hot.  Hot damn.    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Sounds like you got some real cayenne.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif   Penzeys is "lightweight" stuff.  
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Okay do you consider all/most of Penzeys lightweight??
     
  4. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Interesting.  I'm planning to do a fennel and white wine pancetta soon, and was planning to get fennel pollen from Penzey's.  Never used them before, they have a good reputation from what I understand.

    As for cayenne, the last batch of pods from my garden are just about dry enough to powder.  Should be some GOOD stuff based on the heat level of the fresh ones.

    mjb.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I once grew coriander, another unbelliferae, and it was a hardy plant yielding lots and lots of seeds.  So I don't see any reason that fennel couldn't be home grown.
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    They, indeed, have a great reputation and a fantastic product line.  My comment was specifically oriented toward the bottle of ground pepper KoKo is using as a comparison.  I would not hesitate to use any of their products, but if I got a bottle of Cayenne that wasn't mind numbingly stinging I'd try another brand.

    Fennel is one of those plans where home-grown can be very valuable, like cilantro (what we tend to call coriander on the West Coast)... since both have many useful parts that can be harvested: seed, pollen, roots, stems, leaves, and for the fennel... the bulb itself if one is growing Florence Fennel.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  7. maryb

    maryb

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    Chili pepper heat can vary from region to region and is often also tailored to the regional market heat wise. Midwest is not known for HOT.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I'm not an expert or anything, but couldn't also rely on the crop of chiles used? I know from experience that buying fresh chiles I have to test the heat on them to know how much I need because sometimes they aren't as spicy as the last.
     
  9. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Yes, growing conditions vary.  My 2012 jalapenos were the hottest, tastiest I've ever grown.  This year's crop was close, but the 2011 ones were fairly tame, as far as fresh home grown chiles go.

    mjb.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Hmm, keep up with all of the great information posted here!