Carving knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by koukouvagia, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I want to buy my husband a gift because he really likes slicing our roasts. I like the wide blade serrated knives, any recommendations that don't exceed $50?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    For meat slicing/carving, I can't recommend serrations in general. They tend to tear up the roast more than the straight blades in my experience. Round tip is generally better than the pointed tip as the point is more likely to catch in the cut though they too have their uses. 

    For home use, I don't think this is a time to drop big bucks on something of a super high grade simply because it doesn't get a whole lot of continuous use. But it's worth having something that works well. Again, to my thinking, this is a good time for something from Forschner who makes good bang for the buck knives that perform respectably. Something from their Rosewood line if you like the better presentation, or from their Fibrox line if price is more important.

    Forschner offers them in 10 and 12 inch sizes, with or without the kullens, (Granton edge). I prefer without kullens, others prefer them. 

    Pricing varies quite a bit. 12" fibrox with kullens, 25.99. 10" Rosewood, without kullens, 59.99. Shop around some and see what you find.  I like to use Roger Clauch for Forschner products as he has a good price and good customer service. http://www.knifeworks.com/forschnerslicingknives.aspx   If it's not on his site, send him an email and he'll likely take good care of you. 

    12" is probably a bit better for large cuts of meat, but 10 is easier for most home cooks to handle. Consider how you'll store it. Few knife blocks will take a 12" blade. Even 10" is a lot for many home oriented knife blocks.

    My slicer is a 10"  Meyer with kullens. It's OK and I got it very inexpensively.  But I think the Forschner is the better knife. 
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
  3. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    >>serrated

    what phatch said.  not the best in my experience.

    for cleaning slicing roasted meats - beef/poultry/whatever - the key is a long knife that is really sharp.

    >>long
    you can carve a turkey with a sharp three inch pocket knife.
    as can be imagined, works - not pretty

    the length needs to be about 3x whatever you're thinking to carve.  for home use - 10 inch likely okay.  if you're gonna' do a 50 pound steamship round, more length needed.

    >>sharp
    this is the key.  one long easy pressure pass is the the target - if it's not sharp and you wind up "sawing" off a slab of the roast, stick with Cutco serrated.....

    learning the basics of "how to sharpen" is neither rocket science nor ill-advised.  nor does it entail thousands of $$ in 'gadgets' - a $20 tri-corner stone from Sears will do it just peachy keen.
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Okay then I need further recommendations.  I, too, want a slicing knife to obtain sheets of fatback from the entire pork fatback.  The "whole fatback' will measure approx 4 inches wide by 10 inches long by about a half an inch thick.  So I want to get as many sheets of 1/8 inch thick fatback as I can from that chunk in order to line a terrine for pate.

    Would this Forschner slicer be the one to get?????  And I can't tell if the knife has 'teeth'.

    Okay I can't see the difference between Forschner 40542 and Forschner 47542
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    A long time ago back in the '70s, I remember seeing a photo in Pepin's book, either La Technique or La Methode, his using a similar round tipped slicing knife to get sheets of fatback.  And to secure the entire chunk of fatback in place, it was pierced at one end by a very sharp two-pronged fork with the tines stuck into the wooden cutting board.  The fatback, to facilitate slicing/sheeting, previously had been placed into the freezer to bring the meat to a not quite frozen solid state: firm so that it wouldn't buckle.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013