Caramel

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by konr, Jan 30, 2014.

  1. konr

    konr

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    I make a caramel Bavarian cream.i use the dry method.for how long should I boil the mixture sugar-cream.does it have to reach a specific temperature?
     
  2. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    I don't think there should be any boiling going on after the (whipped) cream is added.

    mimi
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  3. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    oops.

    I didn't quite get what you were asking.

    If you are referring to the actual custard component... I bring to a boil and then shut it down to a simmer.

    It is done when the mixture coats the back of a spoon.

    Times will be different for just about everyone depending on elevation, ambient humidity, type pan used and so forth and so on.

    Re temp?

    IDK sorry.

    mimi
     
  4. konr

    konr

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    I make a dry caramel with the sugar.then I add the warm liquid cream to stop the process.this mixture (melted sugar-cream)should boil for some specific time until it gets the right temperature?is it necessary?with that mixture I make then a cream anglaise and finally add the semi whipped cream
     
  5. jcakes

    jcakes

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    I would make the caramel and then let it cool sufficiently to be added to the anglais and the whipped cream; in my experience I don't let it cook after adding the warmed cream.  I like a very dark caramel otherwise to my taste it gets diluted after you add the anglais and whipped cream...
     
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