Caramel cone (impossible)

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by Hunae, May 5, 2019.

  1. Hunae

    Hunae

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    Hello to you,

    It's been a while since I've been trying to solve a challenge that is really close to my heart. But after fifteen attempts I demanding your help.
    I try to make a caramel cone (open below to add the pana cotta thereafter). I thought of putting the pana cota (also a cone) at the time of service, but since I can not achieve the caramel cone I have not yet arrived at this stage.

    I mainly tried to cook my caramel and dipped the form in the caramel directly - impossible to detach the caramel from the form.
    Also by putting baking paper around the conical shape - impossible to remove the baking paper from the caramel without breaking it.
    And many other inconclusive tests.
    I prefer to do it with the caramel instead of isoterm

    Thanks for reading me,
    Yours truly
     
  2. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Have you tried putting aluminum foil over the cone mold and spraying it with pan release?
     
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  3. fatcook

    fatcook

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    My first thought was plastic wrap might be able to be peeled off after cooling, and then my crazy brain suggested an ice cone. It should be cold enough for a pretty instant set and the outer layer should melt enough to release the caramel - but that may be too wet and it would just dissolve.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
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  4. chefross

    chefross

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    I've done this but on a much smaller cone using Cannoli molds sprayed with pan release. The caramel is key, as you know, and getting it to the right consistency to coat and cool and mold.
    My suggestion would be to create your own mold the size you want. You can make it from wood or aluminum. Both work with spray release.
     
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  5. jcakes

    jcakes

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    If the panna cotta is already shaped into the cone shape, what about doing what @chefpeon suggests and taking it one step further, just make a caramel cage in the shape of the cone, making the threads close together.....
     
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  6. foodpump

    foodpump

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    How about freezing the panda cotta in individual molds, and the dipping the panda into warm caramel, or drizzling warm caramel over the panna?
     
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  7. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    I couldn't think of an easy way, so here is how you COULD do it. (an assistant would really help!)

    Make your caramel, instead of arresting cooking process, pour quickly on SLIGHTLY greased parchment, in circles. The radius, should be approximately the size of your desired finished cone. Use a greased straightedge, like your longest knife, to score the hot caramel into four, six, or eight segments. Just like you cut a round Pizza!

    As caramel cool it get thick, if you pour circles slowly, you could end up with tooth breaking results due to thickness. The assistant is for following behind you making the scores in the circles.

    When cool, the segments will break cleanly along score lines.

    Gently warm the triangular segments of caramel to 120-130F and individually wrap the now pliable caramel on a greased cone form. If you don't have heat lamps, you would probably have to use a very low oven. Start with warming three at a time, staggered. When each is ready, put in one to take its place. Because the temp is low, cooling would only be a short time. I would have at least three cones for molding ready.

    They should be stored in cool place in a sealed container, not touching, and with some sort of desiccant.

    If I wasn't clear enough, ask for clarification!

    I changed my photo to some of my sugar madness.
    Break the crystal ball to get to your dessert! What was I thinking...
     
  8. jcakes

    jcakes

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    What about just making florentines and shaping them into cones as they come out of the oven, using the same technique SGMChef describes... it's not caramel, but close, and crispy....