Canola vs Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by delta223, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    There are times I want a nuetral flavored oil and will go with canola for that purpose. Usually for deep frying as it's fairly inexpensive for that. Peanut oil is better but doesn't always fit in the budget. For smaller amounts of neutral oil, I've been using grapeseed oil the last few years or for pan use too.
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Most oils today for commercial use now (not your house)  are processed and other things added like silicone dioxide which prevents foaming of the oil and therefore gives a longer life.Many are semi hydrolgenated. They  strive to make them last long and impart  no flavor. Years ago I did some work for Bung who is a major source of cooking oils to the trade I learned quite a bit from their guys. Hardes thing for them is to maintain consistency of product because the source of the oil comes from different locations and different soil and weather conditions. prevail. Their plants by the way ar immaculate.
     
  3. peterd

    peterd

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    After years of selective breeding in the 1950s and 60s, Rapeseed and Canola are no longer the same plant. If Rapeseed is indeed grown in some parts of the world, its' oil would definitely be an inferior product. Canola was bred to improve the healthiness of the oil for human consumption. The only genetic engineering happened much later when Monsanto wanted to develop a plant resistant to Roundup. Most of the varieties of canola are not genetically modified and a couple of varieties are. That holds true with every crop that Monsanto has got their hands on. Maybe a little time spent researching a topic before weighing in would really improve the forum.
     
  4. ishbel

    ishbel

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    All I can do is reiterate:  Canola is not sold in most places in the UK, whilst rapeseed oil IS.

    Perhaps YOU need to do a more world-wide research project, instead of pointing fingers at the membership?
     
  5. breadmaker man

    breadmaker man

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    I pretty much use olive oil for everything. It's a lot healthier and I never seem to get bad results with it.
     
  6. peterd

    peterd

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    I am familiar with the UK's rapeseed oil. I travel there at least once a year. Rapeseed and canola oil are two separate products and if you don't understand this, there is no point to carry on this conversation.
     
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Todays Canola is  a far cry from the original oil. Today it is extracted from the canola seed from a yellow flowering plant that  who's original was treated and all the bad things removed. The original however was not like this, and was used to produce oil based paints.. Medical claims for it today appear all over the internet, however as one claim states non have been FULLY substantiated. I use it home and at work for deep frying.
     
  8. ishbel

    ishbel

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    And... as I've said to you (peterd) - I've never seen Canola oil in any shop here in the UK.  I'm not saying it's not available - just that I have never seen the product.

    If YOU can't take that on board, then you're right, there is no sense in  carrying on the conversation. 

    BTW - IMO, 'at least one trip a year' wouldn't make you au fait with the UK - just ask Siduri, who travels here from Italy (although she was brought up the USA) a few times a year.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2011
  9. maryb

    maryb

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    Canola oil contains small amounts erucic acid that can trigger digestive problems for some people. Personally I stay away from it. Like BDL I use corn oil for high heat and deep frying and olive oil for pan sautes and even high heat searing. Some specialty oils like sesame for adding flavor to stir fry.
     
  10. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Mary the new process canola has gotten the erucic acid out, at least from what I read in government reports.and the stuff marketed today is a far cry from  the old product.Even the manufacturing process has changed.. I love olive oils on salads but I do not cook with it because the oils have a distinct flavor that sometime over powers what I am making.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2011
  11. allanm

    allanm

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    Ishbel,

    You have seen Canola Oil, the only difference is it is called Rapeseed Oil in Europe.

    Here is a Telegraph article that says that Rapeseed Oil comes from the Canola plant.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/3345221/Bee-Wilson-rapeseed-oil.html

    I am not sure if the difference is a matter of North American versus European usage or if it is because Canola is a trademark.

    You can verify this for yourself. “Natural” Rapeseed Oil has a distinctive extremely bitter taste. Canola oil was specifically bread to have a fairly neutral taste.

    Canola Oil also has very distinctive nutritional profile because of its breeding. Canola Oil is low in saturated fats, 6%, and high in monounsaturated, 62%, and polyunsaturated, 32%, fats. Canola Oil is also high in Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids in a desirable 2:1 ratio. Canola Oil is also a good source of Vitamin E.

    https://canola-council.merchantsecure.com/canola_resources/product52.aspx

    You can compare that to nutritional labels at your local store or compare it with these UK Rapeseed Oil producers.

    http://hillfarmoils.com/

    http://farrington-oils.co.uk/

    http://laemunns.com/

    http://r-oil.co.uk/

    http://www.sussexgold.co.uk/da/87445

    http://www.wharfevalleyfarms.co.uk/

    http://www.borderfieldsrapeseedoil.co.uk/

    Note the low saturated fat (half that of Olive Oil), high in unsaturated fat, good source of Omega-3 and high in Vitamin E.

    General Links

    Canola Oil http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola_oil

    Keith Downey http://www.science.ca/scientists/scientistprofile.php?pID=348

    Baldur Stefansson http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0007687

    Canola Council of Canada http://www.canolacouncil.org/canola_oil_the_truth.aspx

    Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/canola-oil/AN01281

    Urban Legends http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/canola.asp
     
  12. granny smith

    granny smith

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  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    [quote name="Granny Smith" url="/forum/thread/62717/canola-vs-extra-virgin-olive-oil/30#post_343776"]
    Here's an interesting article on canola oil (I may never use it again after reading this!)



    http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/new/canola.htm
    [/quote]

    That seemed pretty slanted and cherry picked for sources besides being old data.
     
  14. siduri

    siduri

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    I'm not sure, allanm, if any of your references are actually from scientific journals (subject to peer review, so the methods are controlled).  Internet is full of all kinds of stuff, and if you have the canola oil council stating something you might suspect some bias.  There can also be plenty of "scientific" sites that simply express an opinion of an individual, or that could actually be put out by someone with a specific interest, either in favor or against the product. 

    I also distrust medical sites, even with prestigious names like mayo clinic. 

    Best to see the actual research that they base their findings on. 

    It;s only an idle curiosity, because i can't find either canola or rapeseed oil here, and i don't much see the point in going looking for it, since there are plenty of functional oils that have been around a very long time and so any negative long-term effects are likely to have come to the surface. 

    In fact, i tend to always prefer something that has been around for a while for that reason - we know the side effects of aspirin, it's got a very long history - paracetamol and ibuprophen are more recent. Other stuff even more so.   Unless i'm having an attack of gastritis, i'll go with the aspirin! 
     
  15. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Quote Alanm; "...You have seen Canola Oil, the only difference is it is called Rapeseed Oil in Europe...."

    There's a yes and a no in your remark.

    In Europe -and especially in dutch spoken countries-, there are 2 different kinds of oils that refer to Canola!

    Let me explain. There's koolzaadolie and raapzaadolie. Koolzaad and raapzaad are the dutch names of the plants and olie simply means oil. An important side-note to make this even more complicated; both oils are called in french huile de colza.

    BTW, "koolzaad" (hence the sound of the french word Colza) is one of the 2 dutch words that have sneeked their way into french (the other is kermis if you want to know)!!

    Both plants look very much the same, but raapzaad (hence the name rapeseed) isn't cultivated all that much. It was used for industrial purposes. Nowadays, there's practically no other cultivation than "koolzaad" or colza in french, used to make oil and to be used in food for  animals, and, for making bio-diesel!!

    Now, (I had to look this up) Canola oil is a variant of "koolzaadolie", which is a healthy oil and certainly not "raapzaadolie"!! Sadly enough, the english productname rapeseed is wrongly used... for both plants!!!

    The name rapeseed is very incorrect to refer to canola oil, it should be colzaseed or something similar that point at koolzaad instead of raapzaad...

    BTW, on the raapzaad and koolzaad plants; "raap" means turnip in dutch. "Kool" means cabbage. "Zaad" means seed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011
  16. maryb

    maryb

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    The FDA guideline is under 2% so there is still some present. Canola oil is processed to remove bad stuff and that can add other bad stuff. I should have added that I use a lot of butter also for sautes, eggs, etc. I will stick to the oils that take less processing that can introduce other fatty chain molecules that can be bad for us.
     
  17. pxatkins

    pxatkins

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    Peter has the truth of it; Canola and rapeseed are sufficiently different they no longer cross-pollinate. There was a lawsuit settled in favour of Monsanto when a Canadian farmer claimed his Roundup resistant rapeseed crop was contaminated by cross-pollination from a neighbour's Canola fields. He lost. The gene making the plant resistant to Monsanto's roundup (a powerful herbicide) was first identified and isolated by a Govt. of Saskatchewan Min. of Ag. scientist. There was a court battle over who owned the patent. Monsanto won. Because it's GM, it's banned in the EC.
     
  18. onepiece

    onepiece

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     Olive oil for deep frying?!?!  Not to mention the price, but Olive oil has its own flavor too.  I use Corn oil for all my deep frying needs.  It cheap, and doesn't leave a strong taste of the oil.
     
  19. siduri

    siduri

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    Well, that's interesting, Chris, i have heard of olio di colza here too!  It was always presented as a kind of crappy oil, not for sale in supermarkets, and used in mixtures of cheap oil.  If i'm not mistaken.  Or, possibly i saw it in a very cheap olive oil called "olio di colza e di oliva" and i thought colza meant maybe some sort of crappy third or fourth pressing of olives. 
     
     
  20. allanm

    allanm

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    Siduri,

    None of my links go directly to peer reviewed sources however you can drill done in most of them, except for the producers websites, since they supply references. I gave a large number of independent producers so they could collaborate each other.

    Wikipedia doesn't have conventional peer review but their multiple eyes plus citations method has proven as accurate a conventional review under multiple studies. In any case the article citations are a good source for doing your own research.

    Mayo Clinic publications are obviously editor reviewed and being well read by peers in the field anything unorthodox would be quickly challenged.

    The canola council website does reference a lot of peer reviewed material.

    The snopes article is endorsed by Quackwatch. Quackwatch acts to peer review alternative medicine. See the wikipedia article for information about Quackwatch and why they are trustworthy.

    http://www.quackwatch.org/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quackwatch

    If you want peer reviewed information that is not from a scientific or medical source I am not sure what I can offer.