Canele moulds

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by coup-de-feu, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    Hi all,

    I have canele moulds, but no good recipie for them.  They are the old fashioned 16th of an inch tin lined copper sort, which are said to give a better crunch to the outside of the cake when preheated...  I have tried a recipie or two off the net, but have not been able to make them like they were in France: Very small bubbles/fine texture, crispy shell and almost gooey/chewy intiroir.

    Does anyone have a tried and true formula for canele Bordeaux?[​IMG]
     
  2. chefelle

    chefelle

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    I use the one from Pierre Herme's La Patisserie de Pierre Herme.  They come out perfectly. 

    I can post the formula for you if you'd like.

    Nice molds by the way.  I paid over $250 for mine...they are just like yours and I only got six of them for the price.
     
  3. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    Heck yeah!  I don't have that book.  I got Herme's Larousse chocolate encyclopedia - good stuff.

    I only got 6 of them too, but I'd better not say what I payed for them...
     
  4. marketdaycanele

    marketdaycanele

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    I found Clotilde's recipe a very good starting point. The molds should be brushed with beeswax and butter and then chilled before filling and baking.
     
     
  5. titomike

    titomike

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    They're special 'cos they're so different.

    I learned to make them when I briefly worked for a french Pastry Chef...they were a specialty from where he was from and if I remember correctly the batter does/needs to hold/mature so six could work for you.

    I was alone in the kitchen with his recipe folders from 4am but was shy to record anything w/o his permission & then got made redundant on the phone!

    Aaahh.... regrets!
     
  6. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Chefelle,

    Could you post your recipe please ?

    ..here is what my moulds look like, the heart shaped and shell ones I use alot.

    [​IMG]
     
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2010
  7. chefelle

    chefelle

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    Canneles

    Recipe from "La Patisserie de Pierre Herme"

    500 cc (16 oz) milk

    1 vanilla bean

    On the previous day, split and scrape the vanilla bean and add the seeds and pod to the milk in a small saucepan.  Bring mixture to the boil.  Once boiled, remove from heat and allow cool.  Cover and refrigerate overnight.  Discard pod before use.

    50 g of melted butter

    250 g of sifted confectioner's sugar

    2 egg yolks

    2 eggs

    100 g of sifted flour

    15 g of dark rum

    Mix all ingredients in the following order...first the confectioner's sugar follwed by the yolks and eggs, then the rum, the butter, the flour, and lastly the cold milk.  Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before baking.

    Baking:

    Grease molds with butter mixed in equal parts with a fat for greasing pans or beeswax.  Keep in a cool place....molds must be very cold before filling and baking.  Fill them with the cannele mixture up to 1-2 cm from the brim.  The preparation must be mixed again each time it is going to be used.  When kept in a cool place it will last up to 3-4 days. 

    Bake in a convection oven at 180-190 C (350 F) for approximately 50 minutes.  Unmold immediately.  Eat once cool.

    Hints:

    The cannele does not keep and must be eaten the same day.  The outside of the bun must be dark brown.  It is said "when black, it's "baked".  Sometimes the canneles will swell during baking, they should then be pricked with the point of a knife.

    Happy baking! 
     
  8. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Y'all are so lucky to own those pretty copper molds! I baked my caneles in silicone...../img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif
     
  9. chefelle

    chefelle

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    How did they turn out, Annie?  A friend of mine sent me a bunch of silicone molds from France.  Haven't used them yet.
     
  10. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    They turned out pretty ok actually. But there's a certain crunch you can get on the surface of a canele that's made with the real copper mold and beeswax that you just can't duplicate! For my purposes though, silicone was my solution to a production problem. I could crank more out faster with the silicone molds.
     
  11. titomike

    titomike

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    Annie, great site....you are so imaginative, skilled & talented! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  12. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    Thanks for the recipes and tips.  I have never heard of using beeswax before - I'm intrigued, I'm trying to figure what the advantage of it is.. is it that it is stiff at room temp?  Good to know that the molds must be cold too.

    thanks

    CDF
     
  13. chefelle

    chefelle

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    I hear ya, Annie.  That's the same reason I had my friend pick up some silicone molds for me...only six copper molds was rather limiting.

    Funny though.....trying to sell canneles in Canada was an interesting proposition.  Everyone thought that I burnt the ratsnot out of them because they were so dark.  I had to give out samples for weeks before people caught on....then they REALLY caught on and I was in big trouble due to the problem of only six molds!
     
  14. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    I guess if you are in business silicon is the way to go.

    Q: how do you clean the copper molds?  I've been scraping each rib out individually with a skewer stick - it takes forever!  Even when they unmold neatly there is still some flour dust that gets stuck in the ribs.
     
  15. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    If you use a combination of 50% beeswax and 50% butter, then the caneles should come out cleanly enough that you shouldn't even have to worry about cleaning the molds between batches. 

    Chefelle: I know what you mean about the burnt look being off-putting to customers! I had to sell my caneles the same way......extensive sampling!

    Titomike: thanks for the compliments!
     
  16. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Actually the molds don't need to be cold, but it helps. The beeswax/butter combo sets up very quick, even at room temp. The purpose of the beeswax is to help the caneles come out cleanly and also adds to that certain texture that the outside of them have. 

    When I've used the silicone molds, the caneles actually came out great, and better yet, I didn't have to mess with the messy beeswax/butter stuff. The silicone molds require no greasing at all. And the caneles pop out like magic.
     
  17. chefelle

    chefelle

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    I never used the beeswax. I just buttered the molds really, really well and they came out fine.

    As for cleaning them, I don't think you're supposed to wash them at all.  I just use an old pastry brush to scrub out whatever sticks to the inside. 

    Pierre Herme says to rub the inside of the mold with a soft white cloth while the mold is still warm.
     
  18. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Chefelle,

    Thank you so  much for posting that recipe. I just logged on after being away and was so glad to see it. I plan on making it this week.

    Again, thank you.....
     
  19. marketdaycanele

    marketdaycanele

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    Hey Guys I'm new and all but I wanted to share a few observations

    From post #7 "Bake in a convection oven at 180-190 C (350 F) for approximately 50 minutes". (190 C= 174F)

    Is that a typo?  I haven't got his book but his recipe is discussed in the egullet forum. The information there differs from what you show.

    I've not seen directions to cook canele at so low a temp. Doesn't Herme suggest 200c (392F) at 50 minutes for the very small 3.5 cm molds? Paula Wolfert suggests 375F convection for 75 minutes for the conventional size mold. Clotilde suggests 480F for the first 20 minutes then 375 F for 40 to 60 more at 375 to finish. Clotilde's technique, using 2 temps is similar to what you see in the video at Le canelé Ballardran website. It is the technique we employ at Market Day Canele in Philly. We sell about 1000 canele each weekend.

    Two other points:

    post #10. "But there's a certain crunch you can get on the surface of a canele that's made with the real copper mold and beeswax that you just can't duplicate!"

    Not so..... We bake in both silicone and copper. While it is easier to achieve a proper crust with copper, silicone moulds do produce perfectly crispy results.  Our customers cannot tell them apart.

    post #7.  "The canele does not keep and must be eaten the same day." Does Herme say that?

    In Bordeaux canele are reheated and sold again the day after they are made and sometimes the day after that. While they are at their best in the first hours after baking they are perfectly delicious for 36-48 hours.

    Also if your canele  puff too much and threaten to topple you can simply remove them from the oven until they deflate. Keep your eye on them and get them back inside ASAP. Excessive puffing is usually the result of too low a starting temp or too old of a batter.

    [​IMG]

    @ Chef Peon........Using the beeswax butter mix adds both flavor and texture even when using the silicone molds.[​IMG][​IMG]
     
  20. titomike

    titomike

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    Thanks MarketDayCanele ....very helpful & a great looking product!

    Well, I'm sold... popped on another tab and bought a silicone mould x10.

    Fits the bill as a classy, 'point of difference' item to offer with coffee, hopefully as the kitchen's only responsibility to 'represent'..were usually pretty busy with the main menus so we buy-in a variety of muffins for FoH./img/vbsmilies/smilies/blushing.gif

    The long-life batter is great and the 2 day window is more good news...this is what my previous Chef did as well.

    The 2 temp cook makes sense to me with eggs as the raising agent (similar to choux paste) ...seems like more 'refined' technique.

    While I'll bet the beeswax/butter was originally about greasing the copper moulds and possibly aided turn around but I hear the voice of experience saying its worth the effort.

    Thanks everyone for the fun & efficient thread so far...