Can You Reduce Coffee?

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Can you reduce coffee after brewing it? I know the actual beans don't react well to heat, but what about the liquid after brewing? Just Cold brewing and curious if I can make things even stronger.
 
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Won't cost you much to find out. Brew a pot and simmer it down. 

I don't think it would be very good but I'm basing that on my experience with coffee that has sat on the warmer for too long. If you reduce it rapidly it might get a different result. Coffee is one of those funny substances that seems best when fresh, brewed correctly. 

But then it depends too on what effect you are hoping for. There are other ways to get stronger flavor and if caffeine is what you want, there are brands that specialize in high caffeine coffee.

Go ahead and simmer down a pot or two and tell us what you find. 
 
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It will make it bitter. You can let it sit out and use evaporation to reduce it or an even more simple solution is to just use less water when brewing.
 
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The general idea of what I want is coffee with cream that doesn't dilute the flavor. I think I just need to add more grounds and cold brew for longer
 
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Another idea I'm thinking about is cold brewing using vodka instead of water.
 
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You can reduce coffee without getting a bad bitter taste but you have to use quality coffee and do so very very slowly. Coffee at a rapid rolling boil will eventually release tannins which tastes like you know what. But my question is why would you want to--if you want a strong rich cup of coffee get ahold of French roast or some other rich coffee, grind it fine for espresso, then use double or triple the amount.
And dats wut its awl a'bout!
 
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You can reduce coffee without getting a bad bitter taste but you have to use quality coffee and do so very very slowly. Coffee at a rapid rolling boil will eventually release tannins which tastes like you know what. But my question is why would you want to--if you want a strong rich cup of coffee get ahold of French roast or some other rich coffee, grind it fine for espresso, then use double or triple the amount.
And dats wut its awl a'bout!

Well, if I do it at work, I don't have to pay for the coffee. Maybe I'll bring in my own grinder so I can get it extra fine.
 
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Here's a thought thats 180 g degrees in the opposite direction:

Boost your coffee flavour with instant coffee.

One you bring coffee past the boilling point (reducing it) the flavour is gone
 
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Coffee is like any other stock that is steeped.  If coffee beans had bones, that could open up quite a different discussion.

Anyway, I really have nothing of any further use to add to this thread, but it did remind me of something.  Don't know if any of you are familiar with Riders in The Sky, an old time cowboy/western music band. They did a radio variety show for some number of years, Riders Radio Theatre.  Every show had an ongoing adventure skit, the camp cook was named Sidemeat. When someone wanted more of his coffee, he'd say

"I'll pour, you twist."

Must have been some REALLY reduced stuff.

mjb.
 
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Coffee is like any other stock that is steeped.
If coffee were a stock, it would be a fish stock. Prolonged heat and reducing are iffy propositions. They both can be done, but comes the question...why? More beans and less water is far more simple.
 
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Interesting thread.. anyone ever thought of doing a coffee glaze or syrup? That would still require reduction to concentrate.. but from what you experienced fellows are saying that would be a bad plan. Personally I'd just use espresso powder.. all the hard work is done already.
 
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Actually I have done a glaze a couple of times, the key is just low and slooww on the reduction, not even a simmer. Syrup is easy, make a simple syrup and while still hot pour over ground coffee and let steep. Then strain through a fine mesh.

Coffee Glazed Stuffed Chicken a boneless and skinless breast, stuffed with grilled Orange Chipotle glazed Plantains, then brushed with a Costa Rican Coffee Glaze and grilled

Coffee Lacquered Stuffed Chicken Breast with Redeye Gravy with a Coffee Glaze, stuffed with Black Forrest Ham, Leeks, and Sage , then grilled and topped with a Ham and Coffee flavored Sauce
 
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We reduce leftover coffee for pumpernickle bread, simmer burner on low. I've ever tasted it though, so no idea if it would be drinkable.
 
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I have no issues with you reducing your cold brew. I would not, however, try to reduce it with the grounds still in it (but that wouldn't be cold brew at that point anyway now would it?)

So strain your cold brew and bring it to temp in a pot. You don't need for it to boil to reduce. Just get it hot enough to sit there & steam...it may take a little while, but it should reduce for you.

It would be a great experiment. Cold brew isn't bitter to begin with so reducing this way may just work out for you.

Good luck.
 
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