Can You Guess The Spice ?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by petalsandcoco, Aug 23, 2010.

  1. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    There is a company called " Epices de Cru " , they are also known as the " Spice Hunters".   On one of my visits to a spice store  I was looking for a certain spice....found the product, it was sealed and nicely packaged, but when I got home and opened it up to see inside......

    I found this.........can you guess the spice ? I am used to seeing this in powder form but not like this.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks like mace?
     
  3. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    And the Grand winner of "Can you guess the spice ?" is ...........drum roll please....ok thats good.....

    Our very own, Mr Phatch !  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif   

    I actually wished there were more spices to show.....thank you.

    ps. the flavor is out of this world.
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    And, FWIW, each of those strips is called a blade.
     
  5. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Maybe a real easy one to ask but........ who know's where mace comes from?

    KYH and phatch know for sure.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2010
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    It's the skin of the nutmeg nut, ya nut.
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    And the difference between the two (nutmeg and mace)?

    Ah, hem. Sometimes you feel like a nut

    Sometimes you don't

    Sorry about that.
     
  8. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Well alrighty then........was hoping a non "forum guru" would take this one but it's all good. Almond Joy's got nuts Mounds don't..... Beeecause...........Hehehe
     
  9. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Taking a total uneducated stab in the dark here....Nutmeg being the shell, mace being the...ohh lordy I really don't know...refraining from Wiki and Google, although the force is strong....inside meat of the nut?  Go on /img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gif  shoot me down in flames/img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
     
  10. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    ok...just Googled...close to the mark I guess.  Sorry, I had to do it /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
     
  11. slayertplsko

    slayertplsko

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    Really that easy? My first guess was mace, but I thought that would be too easy.:)
     
  12. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    L'audace, l'audace, toujours l'audace, Slayertpisko.

    Worst thing could have happened you would have been wrong. No big thing. And, if you put a question mark after your response, you get the best of both worlds. Thus:

    Mace?
     
  13. siduri

    siduri

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    Mace is the outside of the nutmeg nut. So it always said in various cookbooks. At least it is outside of the nut, but outside that there must be some sort of fruit, if the nutmeg is actually a nut.  or not? 
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    That's the trouble with trying to apply botany to cuisine, Siduri. It get's a little hairy sometimes.

    My understanding is that nutmeg isn't really a nut. It's a fruit. So what we call the nutmeg is the dried flesh, and the skin is the mace.

    Would I swear to this? Not hardly.

    What I do know is that mace is the skin that gets peeled away from the kernel, and the kernel is the "nut." 
     
  15. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Wikipedia shows the frult flesh, then the mace, then then nutmeg.

    But what are you doing with the mace Petals? I rarely see it called for and then only in books with "old" recipes. So many stores and households have no mace in the spice aisle/rack.

    I mostly use it in some processed meat products from Helen Witty's books, The Good Stuff and Fancy Pantry. (Lots of overlap in those books as Fancy Pantry came out first and was then revised into The Good Stuff.)
     
  16. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    So what did you use it in?
     
  17. durangojo

    durangojo

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    back in my sailing days in the west indies, Grenada,one of the largest southernmost islands, was/is called the 'spice island'. their biggest export is nutmeg, and truly when you drive around, especially after it rains, the whole island just smells of that wonderful spice...gosh, i can still smell it! so the mace, which everyone now knows is the outside of the nut shell itself, is bright, bright red on the tree, and is quite a beautiful sight...it discolors as it dries....i have put it in everything from soup to nuts....curries especially...its really just the mellow little sister of the nutmeg itself, so anywhere you would use nutmeg, use mace..it will most likely outlast you if you freeze it....whatever you do, don't throw it away! you could grind it into a powder and use it that way...the 'islanders' do that...shoot, now i just want to go back!.....

    joey
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2010
  18. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Yesterday I brought it over to my mother's house and she took a piece to see what it tasted like....well, her eyes lit up. It smells like nutmeg, maybe not as strong but it has a wonderful aroma. The skins are chewy, and it tastes like nutmeg but after you take it out of your mouth ( I let it rest on the tip of my tongue) all of a sudden there is a heat that starts ....not hot but a tingling sensation.

    I buy mace for baking.

    Yesterday I warmed up a cup of milk with a bit of honey and put a piece of mace in it ........oh my.

    I will be experimenting more with this....I have some of it drying out , then I will grind it down to a fine powder.

    The other spice I bought is Tellicherry. (heavens !! ) It has to be just about the most intense aromatic peppers I have ever had. My mother tried that too....when I heard "crunch" , I immediately informed my dad of the following, " Dad, in a matter of 10 seconds, her face will go cherry red, she will smile, eyes will water up and she will break out laughing ...." sure enough.

    I don't know, with that pepper its like a pleasure/pain type of thing. Its just so intense the aroma when you freshly grind it.

    So there you have it , two wonderful spices. There should be a thread just on pepper......
     
  19. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    When I was a kid, mace blades were available wherever spices were sold. Now mace is generally available only in powdered form.

    So, my problem has always been that most recipes that use it say something like, "3 mace blades...." Uh, huh. And just what does that translate to as powder?
     
  20. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I knew that spice immediately. Anyone that has done any significant work with Indian cuisine should know it. The local Indian market is also the only place I could find it around Central Florida and it is in blade form. I have read that it is best described as the "husk" of the nutmeg.