Can someone please explain the difference of the terms "soup, stew and broth"?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by insanechess, Jun 23, 2013.

  1. insanechess

    insanechess

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    I Just Like Food
    Hello!
    Sorry, but it is very difficult to find on Google the difference on these terms.
    Can anyone help me?

    Soup, stew and broth.

    Thank you for your attention!
    See you.

     
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Soup is a finished dish, usually containg stock/broth. But in the case of a chowder, for example, I wouldn't use the term stock at all

    Broth and stock are not rigourously defined or used in English. They're often used interchangably.  I tend to use the term stock for an unseasoned basic liquid from simmering the bones and aromatics. Broth for when that liquid is ready for use (because of seasoning/reduction) or in use in the soup.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Former Chef
    Soup - as defined above.

    Stew - thick meat-based soup.

    Broth - thin, clear soup/sauce base made from meat.

    Stock - thin, clear soup/sauce base made from bones.