Can granulated white sugar be replaced with juice sugarcane, coconut sugar or anything else for that

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by marinpa, May 22, 2015.

  1. marinpa

    marinpa

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    Hello,

    I am starting a production of fruit jam, marmalade, and juices and I would like to know if I can substitute granulated white sugar  with something else such as sugarcane raw juice, coconut sugar or anything else?

    I would like to produce assortments of jam, marmalade, juices, etc that can be consumed by diabetic people as well.

    Now I know what is the granulated white sugar's role into the mix, but I was hoping I can use something else to replace it.

    Thank you anticipated for your time and effort

     
  2. jellly

    jellly

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    Why would coconut sugar be different for diabetics than cane sugar?  

    I am not being sarcastic, I use coconut sugar for something at work and am curious.
     
  3. marinpa

    marinpa

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    Fore one:

    Coconut Sugar has a GI of 35 (due to a dietary fiber called Inulin, which may slow glucose absorption, as well as acting as prebiotic )

    White table sugar has a GI around 60

    Back to the dietary fiber, clinical research finds than inulin support:

    gut health

    colon cancer prevention

    blood sugar balance

    lipid (fat) metabolism

    bone mineralization

    fatty liver disease

    obesity

    immunity boost

    Second and third, CS has short chain fatty acids, polyphenols and antioxidants that may also provide some health benefits and minerals such as:

    Iron

    Zinc

    Calcium

    Potassium,

    along with some 

    That's some of the things from the top of my head. I know that the department of agriculture in Philippines made an extent research on this with the whole nine yards lab and analyses test  

    However, at the end, Coconut Sugar is 78% ( - 22% Nutrients, inulin, and antioxidants) still sugar. However compared with 100% table sugar is still a better choice.
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    How about plant based sweeteners such as Stevia?
     
  5. marinpa

    marinpa

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    ChefRoss, from what I know, stevia does not support/promote a state of health.vStevia can trick the body into a state of hypoglycemia, but thing is, does not have the same effect on everyone’s blood sugar, in the same way or same degree.

    Unless you grow it and use it raw, often time, due to the industrial processing,  Stevia contains many other substances such as: 

    Glycerine, Natural flavors (that could be anything), Xylitol, Dextrose.

    One last thing, Stevia molecules have a hormone structure. Lookup for "Sarah Ballantyne", a respected nutrition scientist, that says:

    "Steviol glycosides are synthesized in the same pathway and end up being structurally very similar to the plant hormones gibberellin and kaurene.  This means that steviol glycosides have a hormone structure… "

    So if for anyone with autoimmune disease and hormonal imbalance using Stevia can do more harm than good.

    Not to mention the STRONG taste!!!!
     
  6. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    Those are foods I was advised NOT to eat.  I am borderline type 2 diabetes. I tried a product (don't recall the name) to flavor and artificially sweeten seltzer water that contained Stevia.  The taste and smell of the liquid product was unappealing, and pricey. Below is an article I saved.  Don't know how factual it is, but I don't care for the taste. Good luck.  Hope you find something that works.

    http://www.everydayhealth.com/diabetes/diabetes-and-sugar-substitutes.aspx
     
  7. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    Why not leave out extra sweetener? If you use ripe fruit (like here it's strawberry season now), it is quite sweet on its own. Diabetics wouldn't want to eat much of your product anyway, fructose is still sugar though metabolized differently.
     
  8. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    Even fruit has carbs/sugar.  I doubt diabetics would buy this product.  I would take another approach - and not gear it toward diabetics.
     
  9. marinpa

    marinpa

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    You guys are right,my products are not specifically oriented to diabetics, but I would like to find or come up with some recipes that have NO SUGAR for real not "Sugar Free" on the label only.

    I am vegetarian for 24 years, and for the same number of years I excluded completely any refined sugar or product that have in composition refined sugars.

    I think would be absolutely unethical to produce and sell products having an ingredient that me and my family won't touch.

    Hence my crusade to find a real solution to substitute granulated white sugar..
     
  10. maryb

    maryb

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    Every sugar substitute out there tastes bitter to me and has a nasty aftertaste.

    I don't know how you could remove the natural sugars from fruit, maybe with some chemical process but whatever is left I would not want to eat! The sugars are what give the fruit a pleasing flavor, without it would be sour/bitter/inedible!
     
  11. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    You can't have a sugar free product that contains fruit, as Mary said the fruit is naturally full of it. It sounds like you're wanting to produce a no sugar added product, not sugar free.
     
  12. marinpa

    marinpa

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    I am retired and doing this for passion not for money. I invested about 8 K in a jam/juice production lab, where everything is made manual, cooking jam in copper pots, using wood fire stoves, mostly old, old, traditional recipes. 

    I have nothing against natural, raw sugars from beets, sugarcane, coconut, palm, etc, etc. 

    What I am against is the refined sucrose, that is nothing but a highly refined carbohydrate, classified technically as a drug.

    Refined sucrose is destabilizing our inner bio-chemical balance.
     
  13. canele

    canele

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    yes, you can substitute the sugar... but you will need to add pectin into the mix. Sugar is important in the jelling process of the jam. 
     
  14. cerise

    cerise Banned

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  15. jellly

    jellly

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    Marinpa- thank you for taking the time to answer my question. I hadn't known that.
     
  16. marinpa

    marinpa

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    Cerise,

    As matter of fact I would very much like to prepare my products with honey but apparently, the jam maker community do not use it because they say in few months the jam goes bad, namely starts to crystallize. 

    I never smelled or seen lavender honey, but knowing the plant, I assume it has a very strong taste that would overpower other ingredients. I will take a look at it though.