Can anyone reccomend a good curry recipe book?

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 I don't have a suggestion for a book but two things that I learned from a friend who's east-indian, is to pay attention to your green spice. Think of it as an east-indian mirepoix (carrot, celery, yellow onion, green onion, garlic, cilantro, and hot peppers to taste and chopped to your desired consistency.)  This was his basic green spice.  You can modify it to your taste or to the dish that your making with other flavours.

Also, let your curry develop.

 Sorry if I'm off base but Those two tips made a huge difference in my curries, regardless of recipe.
 
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I would agree about Madhur Jaffrey although a little dated. Meena Pathaks Complete Indian Cooking is very good and any of Anjum Anand are also very good.
 
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"cuisines of india" by Smita Chandra is a very good book.Not only does it have excellent recipes, it also has stories about the history of the food most of which are taken from letters and journals written during the early days of British colonization.

You can't beat good food along with the history behind it.
 
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The best book I've ever layed my eyes on is "The world's greatest ever Curries" by Mridula Baljekar. It's so worth it! I've been cooking curries for years using this book, and the recipes are fantastic. You have loads of indian curries recipes, but also Southeast asian recipes. Very, very good.
 
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As my wife is indian ill never out do her in the kitchen as far as indian food :) but I just bought a really good book on indian cooking that has great truly authentic curries, briyani, and even recipes on how to make paneer!  It's titled the dance of spices by laxmi hiremath. Great cookbook for indian! Naan recipes,chutneys, butter chicken, you name it. Definitely worth havin on your bookshelf.
 
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I would recommend Pat Chapmans book, (the founder of the Curry Club).

He has some very good and simple recipes that are very close to the Restaurant versions.

My first book was simply called "Indian Restaurant Cookbook", but I have quite a few of his books now.

This was published back in the 80's and is out of print, but I see them pop up from time to time and I think he might sell them on his website.

I have quite a lot of curry books, but the Chicken Tikka Masala in this book is the closest I have found to the "real" one.

I noticed a couple mentioned here I don't have, so I am off to search for them.
 
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Anyone here have Harvey Day's "The Complete Book of Curries"? (1970 ed.) What do you think of it?  I own it but haven't done much from it, not that there's anything wrong as far as I can see, just haven't gotten into currying that much but would like to start.
 
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I have had the Harvey Day "The Complete Book of Curries" since about 1979/80 when I was living in the Sultanate of Oman.

I make curries regularly -- nearly always based on the Indian sub continent style and I rarely need to refer to Harvey Day's book but I certainly do use it on occasions when venturing into far eastern style curries. I always make my dishes using original herbs and spices and I must say that I have a cupboard which is used only for storage of a very wide selection of ingredients

My book is very worn and stained but it is a valued reference and an old friend. So like many old things ( and I am one -- being in my 76th year ).it is a bit dated in its presentation. It is of course written for the UK market but all its recipes deals in simple measures like teaspoons, tablespoons etc so there is little difficulty in anyone using them, I suspectt that there are quite a lot of folk who still use their copy and treasure it.

I found this reference while trying to find if I could find a copy in good condition that I could buy from somewhere to present to my son 9 who uses mine when he visits me!)

If you have the book then please do use it otherwise there is little point in having it.

Most of my "Cookery Books". are well used and some of them have been with me for 40 or 50 years but but I seem to continue to get the odd new ones.which I read for pleasure -- and for information. I have never stopped learning about cooking! 

My own cookery skills have continually changed and adapted accoring to my circumstances. -- I have cooked for hosts of people at once and also for intimate events. Now, as I live alone,  I tend to plan ahead much more and where possible I prepare meals of several portions which are deep freezable -- curries, casseroles, baking procucts, I try to use my small garden, in season, add to fruits and vegetables stored in my freezer for out of season use.

So if you have got this far  -- please give your Curry Book a go. The recipes are still relevant and still work as well as they ever did!

Sorry for rabbiting on too long!!!!
 
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Pat chapman's curru bible and Balti bible. Covers the old Raj. India Pakistan Bangladesh etc. All editions usually dissapear within days. I managed to buy online a used one in very good condition
 
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Pat chapman's curru bible and Balti bible. Covers the old Raj. India Pakistan Bangladesh etc. All editions usually dissapear within days. I managed to buy online a used one in very good condition
 
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Wyandotte,

Thanks for your response.

I often make very simple curries to try and keep my waistline under control.

Just only yesterday I had plain boiled rice ( I always add a small pice of untreated cinnamon bark into the pot) with a dhall --- just lentils, onions and tomatoes with a dash of chilli and tumeric.

As usual I used about 2 lbs of lentils and made of big panfull which is now portioned up and in my freezer.

Dhall  ( umteen ways of spelling it) can vary hugely -- I always like mine to be quite "thick"   -- like mushy peas - it is easy to adjust the consistency from a broth like soup  to glutinous and "chunky".

I must say that I have got idle in my old age and tend to use the same basic recipe ( from my head) and vary it a bit -- mainly by using different lentils and dried pulses -- as the moment takes me.

I am, by now, an inveterate cook to taste and I am always afjusting flavours and ingredients as I cook.

There is so often a point at which I sample and think  --- It's lacking -  je ne sais quoi -- and ponder what needs to be added to tweek the flavour. I should make it quite clear that this is not always successful.

Thanks for mentioning ebay. I had been lookng on amazon but I haven't been on ebay for over  18 months now. So your reminder was  timely
 
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I have used Madhur Jaffrey's and Julie Sahni's books for years and love them. I also recommend Hari Nayak's My Indian Kitchen and Raghavan Iyer's 600 Curries.
 
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660 Curries by Raghavan Iyer - amazing book. Perfect for a curry neophyte and advanced curry chef alike. Follow the recipes to a T, and it will taste amazing. You will have a much greater understanding of Indian curries as a science and an art and you will then be able to put it into practice on your own. Not to mention the endless amount of recipes at hand.

Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art Of Indian Vegetarian Cooking. By Yamuna Devi - great vegetarian recipes, and if your into Indian curries this is a great place to start as a majority of Indian curry dishes are vegetable based or vegetarian. Sweet desserts too.

Enjoy and Good luck!
 
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"Curry" by Vivek Singh.

Besides dealing with Indian, Pakiatani and Bangladeshi curries, it also has Thai, Burmese, Laotian etc curries in there (the section on Thai curries is written by Dave Thompson)

I also like the Madhur Jaffrey's books
 
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I have almost all the Curry authors listed here. I am very big on 'authentic' even though it is true, this is subjective. Jaffrey is classic, Anjun very nice, Chapman sure, Baljekar too. No complaints with any of the suggestions.

One person mentioned Raghavan Iyer, and I really must underscore this suggestion. 660 Curries should be on the shelf of anyone who loves curry. I must make the disclaimer that I generally glaze over recipe books that begin with a number.. "100 best cakes!" as they tend to be mass produced by publishing houses and not always the best quality. So, having said that I was dubious. But I read the reviews and borrowed it from the library.. many times! Then realized .. "I need my OWN!"

660 Curries by Raghavan Iyer contains curries from all over. It has great explanations with the intro about technique or history, (which I find so essential in successfully embarking on new recipes). He's a likeable engaging author who seems to really love curry, knows what he's talking about, and can impart that effectively. Real whole ingredients and spices, along with recipes that allow you to make everything from scratch. The homemade Paneer recipe started to change my mind about this cookbook. All in all, great bang for your buck... I highly recommend it!

Another cookbook for those who also like to eat vegetarian Indian, here is a title I found at a garage sale and never looked back. I just love it! So reliable and contains many spice combinations for those of you who like to get right into the thick of Indian spices and the multitude of ingredients. Dakshin by Chandra Padmanabhan. Give it a try! 
 
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I used to love madhur Jeffrey's books but so many of the recipes are convoluted

One book I'm loving ATM is the Hairy Bikers curry book. Recipes are very simple and are very easy for the most basic of home cook. Flavours are for the British palate but easy enough to tweak to taste.
 
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I used to love madhur Jeffrey's books but so many of the recipes are convoluted

One book I'm loving ATM is the Hairy Bikers curry book. Recipes are very simple and are very easy for the most basic of home cook. Flavours are for the British palate but easy enough to tweak to taste.
I was surprised by this book. I thought about getting it and couldn't decide, I had so many 'authentic' books I didn't think this would live up to scratch. I was wrong, I bought it in the end and there are some very nice recipes in there. I use it on a friday night instead of ordering a take away!
 
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I've cooked a good few curries from it and living in the back of beyond where ingredients are hard found I've been very impressed - even when I've left out ingredients cos I can't get them

So far extremely impressed

Now looking forward to Rick Steins India. I've followed the series on tv and everything he's cooked is not beyond the home cook. What made me really want his book is he done one dish of cabbage and carrots, same as Madar J , yet used at least 10 less steps.


I do believe in an easy life
 
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