calphalon tri-ply, worth the money?

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Joined Jul 5, 2011
Hi all, I've seen a few posts asking for information on this, but no really clear answers.  I'm a home cook whose looking to buy a nice set of cookware.  I'm looking at the sets because right now I'm being offered a killer deal on a 13 piece set, which is about as much as I'd pay for one or two good pieces of All-Clad, which brings me to my question.  I have some All-Clad and love it, hands down the best.  Howeve, right now I can get the Calphalon Tri-Ply stainless steel for $199 (about $800 open stock value).  I felt it at the store and it seemed to be well constructed.  I didn't care as much for the way it balanced in my hand as compared to my All-Clad, however, several stores (Williams Sonoma and Bed Bath and Beyond, all of whom seemed knowledgeble) said that the Tri-Ply is an excellent product, and comperable to All-Clad in many respects.  I think the only issue that I'm having is overcoming the negative image of the, albeit very entry level and cheap, Calphalon that I had during my college days.  Does anyone have any input in this regards?  Is the Calphalon Tri-Ply as good as the stores say it is?  Thanks!
 
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LOL, no I totally get that.  I own two pieces of All-Clad that I'm very proud of.  As far as my level of skill, I'd say I'm an advanced home user, by no means gourmet, but adept around the kitchen.  I only use my professional grade cookware or the heavy cast iron.  What do you think?
 
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Have to disagree with the idea that copper cores are better than aluminum. The vast majority of clad cookware---including All-Clad---use aluminum. And, unlike other companies, All-Clad doesn't honor it's warranties---which, in my opinion, makes them worthless.

I do agree that for most people buying a set is a false savings. It's almost always better to buy individual pieces out of open stock, and get precisely what you are looking for. Most of the time, when you buy a kit, many of the pieces go unused and merely take up storage space.

FWIW, I have several Calphalon pieces, each of which has had heavy usage, with nary a problem. The only difference I can see between them and All-Clad is the price. Plus, in my hand, they have better handles.

However, let me add that since I rediscovered carbon steel I hardly ever touch my stainless skillets. You might want to consider that as an alternative. We're talking about a material that has all the benefits of cast iron at only about 2/3 the weight.
 
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Agree with KY.   

We recently purchased a bunch of Mauviel's, best, heaviest, stainless-lined, copper cookware.  We bought for it's beauty, and a good thing too.  Very nice to cook with, but not better in any significant way than the old Calphalon anodized aluminum, and no-name commercial aluminum it replaced.  I love the Mauviel, it looks fantastic behind the cabinets' glass doors, on the pot rack, on the stove, and on the table -- but it doesn't make food any better than the old stuff.

Calphalon Tri-Ply is very competitive with other high-end multi-plies, including All-Clad (my experience with A-C has been positive).  That's a good thing.  

Because it's non-reactive, easy to care for, doesn't warp, etc., it's a nice to have stainless-lined multi-ply pots and pans in the most common sizes.  You can buy something that's made in Europe, slightly better put together, a bit more responsive, and/or a skosh better in some other ways you'll never notice on the stove or at the table.  You might even be able to find a better deal. But, at $199, assuming you want all (or most) of the pieces in the set, the Tri-Ply set is a darn good price.  Absolutely nothing wrong with buying a set -- especially, that set.

Good luck,

BDL
 
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Joined Jun 14, 2011
However, let me add that since I rediscovered carbon steel I hardly ever touch my stainless skillets. You might want to consider that as an alternative. We're talking about a material that has all the benefits of cast iron at only about 2/3 the weight.
I'm not familiar with carbon steel. Where have you found this at?
 
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I think I'm gonna call BS on the "Don't buy sets" idea. Do some math when checking out pricing. I don't care if it's got 14 things I'm never-ever gonna use, if it's got the 2 that I am gonna use at better pricing than open-stock. Now I'm not saying to always buy sets, I'm saying that you shouldn't overpay for specific items. I just happen to really like the Calphalon stuff. I've bought 2 sets at Target paying less than getting the open-stock items only. I always do the math before buying, I suggest you do it too. 
 
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I think I'm gonna call BS on the "Don't buy sets" idea....
Perhaps the idea behind the "don't buy sets" is implied?

If the price of the set is less than the items you want to buy, go for it.

HOWEVER, do not get "blinded" by "look at all I get for only "$xxx.xx",
 
 
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NO argument there. The basis of my point is "Do The Math", and don't be shy of sets when doing it.  
 
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