Cake Pop troubleshooting part two

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by jtbosslady101, Mar 13, 2017.

  1. jtbosslady101

    jtbosslady101

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    Okkkk so where to begin! Some how I can't get seem to get my cake pop coating thinned out enough I added paramount crystals to it but stil too thick and my cake was falling off my pop👇🏾 No bueno anyhow does anyone have any suggestions or have you used vegetable oil as a thinner ? Need help with diffpping
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2017
  2. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    The typical issues with cake pop coating are brand, temperature, and method.

    Viscosity varies by brands and types of coating. Wilton candy melts are the worst of the worst. Years ago when I took a cake pop class through Wilton, every batch of coating thickened to an unusable paste-- and that was a Wilton instructor melting their coating! I don't think Wilton is even good for practice because the viscosity is horrendous. If you are using Wilton, try adding a couple tablespoons of crisco after melting.

    Far better brands of candy coatings are:
    Merckens, available through Global Sugar Arts, Craftsy, Kitchen Krafts and a slew of other online retailers. Merckens chocolate products are a favorite among cake and cookie decorators.

    Guittard A'Peels. Guittard is a bit more difficult to find, but it's available online as well.


    Temperature in melting also effects viscosity. Too high temperature, too fast, too long will also cause the coating to become sticky and thick no matter the brand.

    Reduce the power on your microwave to 30 - 40% percent. Heat for about 30 seconds; stir; heat another 20 seconds, stir; repeat and keep reducing the time. Stop heating when there are bits of unmelted candy in the bowl. Just stir and let the residual heat finish the melting. Melting has to be done slowly it takes a bit of patience.

    If you have a heating pad, place a kitchen towel over it, then the bowl with melted coating on the towel. Stir frequently in between dipping. A little heat will buy you time to work. Or place bowl in a warm water bath.
     
  3. jtbosslady101

    jtbosslady101

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    You are amazinggggggg! Ima get that kind of dipping agent and give it a try Ima let you know how it turns out!!!!
     
  4. jtbosslady101

    jtbosslady101

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    What kind of cake mix would u use?
     
  5. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    jtbosslady101

    Yes, Id love to see your results

    I use my scratch cake recipe. If you are going to use box, then Duncan Hines. Duncan Hines is more reliable than Betty Crocker. Bake the cake at least a day in advance to let the moisture adjust. Sugar is hygroscopic, so it will attract moisture from the environment. You want that process to play itself out before you make your cake pops.

    Don't hesitate to use a box mix. For cake pops it's economical and more than adequate. Since the cake is crumbled and mixed with icing, it doesn't need to be the quality of an event cake.

    Adjust the amount of frosting you add to cake crumbs based on the moistness of the cake. You need the mix to be moist enough to hold together, but not too moist as the moisture can wreak havoc with the coating.

    Chilling the cake balls after forming will help set them. But do NOT dip cold cake pops. The difference in temperature between the hot melted coating and a cold cake pop will cause the coating to crack. Things contract when cold, expand when heated. So the cake pop will expand as it warms, the coating will contract as it cools--and your coating will crack. So let your cake pops come to room temperature before dipping.

    If you have a plastic or silicone microwaveable cup, that works best to melt the coating and for dipping. You want the coating in a narrow deep container as opposed to a wide, shallow container. That way you can single dip. A double dip will produce a coating that is too thick to bite through.

    To get uniform cake pops, a disher (scoop) in either a size 40 or 50 works well. The higher the dishes number, the smaller the scoop. The link below is the type of dishers I use for my baking projects that require portioning doughs and batters.

    http://www.webstaurantstore.com/40-...ogleShopping&gclid=CNiq4NT31NICFYmVfgodey4AZA
     
  6. jtbosslady101

    jtbosslady101

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    I have to make 50 for sat morning ... I will start baking the cake Thursday would you refrigerate or have the cake crumb room temp for a day before mixing with icing? Thank you for taking such an interest in helping!!!!!
     
  7. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    You can bake the cake, let it cool completely, the wrap it in plastic wrap and leave it on the counter overnight.

    Next day, crumble the cake and mix with icing. Add just enough icing so the crumbs stick together but still has a bit of crumbly texture. After you form your cake balls, place them on a cookie sheet, wrap and refrigerate for a few hours.

    A lot instructions will tell you to dip them right out of the refrigerator. But you risk cracking the coating if you dip cold cake pops. So let them warm for about 20 mins. You want them to feel near room temperature on the outside, but with a chilled core. Some chill on the inside will keep them on the stick while you dip.

    Also stir your coating well just before dipping to dissipate some of the heat

    Some instructions will tell you to place them in the freezer for 15 minutes. But placing them in the freezer only chills the exterior. It's the center that needs to be chilled, not the exterior. So refrigerating for several hours works best.

    A box of cake mix will yield about 48 cake pops depending on size.

    Once the cake pops are dipped and the coating is set you can store them overnight in the refrigerator. But they need to be cover. If you simply place them in the refrigerator, you risk funky refrigerator orders and tastes, as well as condensation.

    Baker's are a strange lot... some are extremely guarded and don't want to share any tips. But most I think love baking and we want to share that joy.
     
  8. jtbosslady101

    jtbosslady101

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    I think my cake was too moist :( kept on falling off stick even after freezing :( they turned out good just not perfect :(
     
  9. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    Jtbosdylady101, Oh that looks great! You're going to make a perfect batch next time!:)