Buying Advice Japanese Chef Knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by dalailamer, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. sweetrub

    sweetrub

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    It's funny...over the years, I completely got away from my German knives and have built a collection of around 30 or so Japanese knives. To me, they are far superior. There are few places in the world that could really give the Germans a run for their money but, the Japanese certainly have. I have several custom jobs, big names, entry levels, etc.. Of them all, I still finding myself constantly reaching for my Shun because it was the first introduction to Japanese-ish knives I bought. Since then, I've found several brands half the price of the Shun, that out-perform ANY German piece I own. If you'll mainly be using this as a workhorse knife, and not a showpiece, check out brands like Tojiro. I was able to pickup a powdered steel 12" gyuto for under $200.
     
  2. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    Well thanks for your advice @Sweetrub, but the knife is already bought. Since about five weeks actually. 

    Will consider that when extending my "collection" in the future, though. 

    Since we reactivated this threat anyways, is it ok not to spend 100$ or more on sharpening stones?
     
  3. foody518

    foody518

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    For just your new knife, you'll be fine with a medium and fine stone, something like 1k/6k or 800/4k grits. Some sort of flattening solution. Under $100 for those is doable
     
  4. benuser

    benuser

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    If you're somewhat experienced a JIS 500 like the Naniwa Pro 400 and a Belgian Blue can do any job with double bevelled. Belgian Blue are inexpensive, and often overlooked because of the much rarer yellow coticule.
     
  5. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    Hey guys, sorry for my late answer. Just returned from a long trip abroad, I’m back in Germany now.

    And no, I am not a somewhat experienced sharpener. I have never used a whetstone in my life.

    @benuser, regarding the inexpensive stones you recommended: here in Germany the Naniwa Pro 400 seems to start at 52$, including a holder (). Some Amazon plugin is messing up the link for me, included a space in this one: https://www.am azon.de/Naniwa-Superstone-Schleifstein-2004-K%C3%B6rnung/dp/B003V3PLMU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500442912&sr=8-1&keywords=Naniwa+400
    Blue Belgian whetstones of a similar size can be found in a price range of 52 to 87$ (http://www.belgischerbrocken.de/lng/en/belgian-blue-whetstone/?count=40).

    That’s 104$ for two stones, without any other equipment. Would you consider this the minimum for Aogami Super Blue Steel? If so, I am willing to spend that much if it must be, but I would also welcome a cheaper alternative.

    For example, I’ve seen this combo stone being recommended: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store...ucts_id=2055:f03d9b2e96f5118a2f6d6948ee90c53d

    Regarding a flattening solution, is it necessary to start with a proper flattening stone? I have a few tiles lying around, smooth as glass. Was hoping to just glue some sandpaper on them and use those.

    Also, are there any tools which help to hold the correct angle which are worth buying?

    Best regards!
     
  6. foody518

    foody518

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    I think the combo from TFJ is a great value though not sure what your situation would be on any import/customs fees. They are both soaking stones, whereas the Naniwas you linked are effectively splash and go (no soak). Still, neither of those will do what a 400 grit stone will do (though there is the 320 Cerax add-on option in that combo stone link). I don't think you should need a 320-400 grit on your knife a while though, based on the knife you got.

    The way Benuser has recommended sharpening, there is little need for hitting a specific angle time after time. Start behind the edge and do a pass then raise the angle bit by bit until you are at the edge and have generated a burr. This also builds in slight thinning and the easing of any bevel shoulders that might develop through repetitively hitting only one angle. Also, Sharpie/Magic Marker to highlight the edge and somewhat behind it so you have an visual indicator of where is being abraded on the stones. This will help you build some angle control and muscle memory over time as well.
    There are probably also cheap or free phone Clinometer/Tilt apps that can help you visually get a feel for what something like a 15 degree angle looks like

    Glass and coarse sandpaper can certainly work. Just slower, and wash everything off afterwards. Flatten with wetted stones - not when they are in their dry state
     
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  7. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    You're totally right, including delivery (and excluding import tariffs, I don't know if they would apply), the price difference wouldn't even be that big. Just ordered the two stones recommended from benuser.
     
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  8. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    Hi everyone!

    Quick question:

    I feel like it´s time to get a 3rd sharpening stone to complement my Naniwa Super Stone 1000 and the Blue Belgian one. I feel like the Belgian doesn´t quite do the trick for me or just takes a bit too long, so maybe an intermediate step would be helpful. My guess would be a Naniwa 2000 or 3000, but what do I know. Any recommendations?

    The main knife is made of blue super steel, but there are also a couple stainless German ones (X50 Cr MoV 15 I suppose). Splash and go is a big plus.

    Best regards!
     
  9. benuser

    benuser

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    Use the Belgian Blue only for deburring with longitudinal strokes, or, perhaps, with a few very light stropping strokes before that.
    You probably should stay a bit longer on the 1k. You only go to the next stone if you can't reduce the burr any further and it only flips. By the way, I use the Belgian Blue with ... saliva, if you don't mind.
     
  10. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    So what you are basically saying is I should not get another stone?
     
  11. benuser

    benuser

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    There's no need for an intermediate stone between 1k and Belgian Blue, and the BB should be all you need to get rid of any burr after the 1k.
     
  12. dalailamer

    dalailamer

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    OK thank you very much, the money will go towards another knife then :)