Buying a New Kitchen Faucet

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by cairoboy, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. cairoboy

    cairoboy

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    Hi all,

    Time to replace my kitchen faucet. The sink is a large cast iron double bowl. I use a spray hose and have liked the idea of larger lever handles so I can start the water with my forearm when I'm covered with chicken, etc.

    I'm looking for function over fashion, and like the idea of a durable (stainless steel?) finish that I can scrub a bit.

    If anyone has a recommendation, I'm all ears.

    Thanks,
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Been my experience that faucets are like houses: you know it when you see it. So you haunt the plumbing supply places until, suddenly, there it is---that one, over there. No, no, next to it; the one with the tall overhead hose.

    If you haven't bought a faucet in a while there's one cautionary note. Because of modern designs, many of them are rigged for sinks or counters with five holes, rather than the traditional 3 plus spray hose. So make sure whichever one you choose will fit your existing sink structure.
     
  3. cairoboy

    cairoboy

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    Thanks much. I'm looking online at the moment, but thought there might be some who have just done this search
     
  4. kcz

    kcz

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    I just researched faucets for my kitchen remodel, although I was looking for a different style.  Kohler, Delta, and Danze usually get good marks for functionality without breaking the bank.  You can try browsing at www.efaucets.com, www.faucetdirect.com, or www.faucetdepot.com to get ideas.  If you're really opposed to touching the handles with icky hands, you can look at Tapmaster, which makes kickplate-activated devices for faucets.  Look for faucets with a ceramic cartridge (most do now, instead of washers), and be aware that currently manufactured residential faucets usually have a component that restricts flow to conserve water and your new faucet will likely not give you as much water pressure as your old one.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Most of the newer ones I have seen in my local HD. have been made of plastic and made to look like a shiny steel finish. They have learned how to electric plate plastic. About 3 years ago I put in a Kohler which was easy to install and is holding up good and it is steel. Today you can install them cause you need not weld or sweat pipe they have easy connects.
     
  6. cairoboy

    cairoboy

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  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    If that's the one you like, and it fits your sink and budget, then that's the one for you.
     
  8. kcz

    kcz

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    Looks like that one got very good reviews on the faucet sites.  If you're going to get the soap dispenser too, you might want to consider a Never-M-T, which allows you to hook a tubing into a large soap bottle, instead of frequently refilling the little bottle that comes with the dispenser.  http://custominserts-store.stores.yahoo.net/nevsoapandlo.html
     
  9. mikelm

    mikelm

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    I've owned and rebuilt a succession of houses for 45 years; I rebuilt two kitchens and two bathrooms.  I've also owned some 130 apartments and done most of the lighter maintenance on them.  My experience is that the Delta faucets are good-looking, long-lasting, and simple to maintain. The parts have been easy and  inexpensive,  to find and install.

    I hope you take a good look at them.

    When we did a complete remodel of our condo, we succumbed to fashion and fitted it with fancy German Grohe fixtures.  It's been over seven years and we've had just a couple of problems, but the pieces are endlessly complicated.  We had a replace a handle on the - very handsome - kitchen faucet. We got a schematic with the part, and there are about 54 pieces to the faucet..  Near as I can remember, my last Delta faucet had about 16.

    My son, a controls engineer for a national company, shops all over the world for a lot of stuff.  He said that the German-designed equipment is endlessly complex - "they will never use six pieces when they can fit in thirty-seven."

    Maybe that's why I have never had a Mercedes.

    Or, maybe, poverty.

    Mike /img/vbsmilies/smilies/surprised.gif
     
  10. cairoboy

    cairoboy

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  11. lennyd

    lennyd

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    This is an issue I have with my current kitchen faucet.

    Is there anyway to remove or replace the part that is restricting the flow?

    To complicate things this was a brand I was not familiar with, is made in Italy, but was really nice, and priced very well on clearance.

    Been getting by for two years now, but still not seeming to ever get used to the amount of water actually coming out of this thing.

    Any advice or thoughts would be great!
     
  12. dscheidt

    dscheidt

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    Get a better faucet.  By US law, residential kitchen faucets are limited to a maximum flow of 2.2 gallons a minute, at 60 psi.  Except when you're filling pots, or the skink, that's plenty to work with in a properly designed faucet.  There may, or may not, be a flow limiting device that you can remove.  Better faucets don't have one, as designing the faucet to flow properly without one produces better results.  Some fancy brands have them, because they're sold to people who don't care about water and energy usage, and they know they'll get taken out. 
     
  13. lennyd

    lennyd

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    I would have to look to see what brand it is again as it has been a while, but when I purchased it I remember seeing good reviews online, and it was not cheap (I know that is subjective as were bombarded with high priced items that are no better than the others) and has held up well other than the flow issue. I do not remember the exact cost but it was above $200 on clearance, and the orig price was more than double that. So not being a Chinese dollar store faucet, actually made in Italy, and not being too inexpensive I had expected not to have to change it out for a long time.

    Have to wonder if there is a limiting device and it could have a problem, or needing adjustment etc.
     
  14. kaven

    kaven

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    Can't boil water
  15. panini

    panini

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    I'm on my 10th year with a Grohe single lever with pull down spraye rand a Grohe pot filler.
     
  16. amandap

    amandap

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    Just replaced our Moen Extensa after 7 years due to a hole in the hose, and guess what - Moen lifetime warranty works.  We called the company and they delivered it asap - no questions ask.  I was almost shocked - haven't seen that good customer service in a long time.