Butter-it, Beyond, liquid margarine, butter flavored cooking oil

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by nebraskabeef, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. nebraskabeef

    nebraskabeef

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    Hello to all.

    Just curious, in the restaurant you work at, what is the fat of choice for cooking? I am talking about searing, sauteing, etc. The restaurant I'm insists on using liquid margarine for everything. It's not, in my opinion, real food, but it actually does taste pretty good and good lord it is easier than using real butter. What do all of you use?
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    It depends on what I'm searing, sautéing, etc.

    It sure as h3ll is not liquid margarine!
     
    rbandu likes this.
  3. ianman1128

    ianman1128

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    Ew. Im not very food pretentious, but those things are gross. I mostly use a blended oil (canola/olive) and often, depending on what it is Im cooking, combined with butter. 
     
  4. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    "I mostly use a blended oil (canola/olive) and often, depending on what it is Im cooking, combined with butter."

    Ditto here Chef, a good blended, (or mix it myself--just kind of guess) for heavy searing,

    unsalted butter in the mix (for the flavour and solids) for  veggie saute' n tingsa lika dat.

    I NEVER use margarine in the pro kitchen, occasionally at home if I'm out of butter, but never for

    sauces or flavour-saute', and it's  always Imperial or it don't happen.
     
  5. nebraskabeef

    nebraskabeef

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    That's what I'm saying - although, just as a meager line cook, I have no problems using it, I would feel much better about using actual butter. The restaurant I work in was recently rated in the top 10 fine dining experiences in my city, and I was just curious to see if other professional kitchens used this garbage.
     
  6. chef1962

    chef1962

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    We do not unless it is cost related.One thing i did not see is protein fats like rendered chicken beef fats.This would be ideal.Real butter is black market butter from the farmer.ask one.The health dept. will not allow this be used in kitchens now because it is not pasteurized 
     
  7. deepsouthnyc

    deepsouthnyc

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    We use pure olive oil or a mixture of pure olive oil and butter. We also use rice bran oil.

    Our restaurant has stopped using canola oil because canola oil is produced from GMO seeds. As a restaurant, we don't support it.
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I've used everything from peanut oil to pomace olive oil (using evoo or a blend for sauteing is a waste of money) grape seed oil, to rendered veal kidney fat for high heat sauting; bacon and rendered bacon fat,  to rendered chicken schmalz (for soup mirepoix--can't be beat) to duck fat for sweating and light searing.  Butte rfat (ghee, clarified butter) can be used for quite a bit of medium to high heat sauting--for brief periods of time.

    I don't eat tofurkey, and I don't don't sell it.  Nor do I advocate the use regurgitated/transformed chicken bacon, or any foods made to imitate the taste of other foods.  If you want the taste of butter, then for (deleted)'s  sakes, use butter.
     
  9. chef1962

    chef1962

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    That is what i am talking about real fat yeh!
     
  10. shaunmac

    shaunmac

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    The restaurant I previously worked at, seafood joint, used a mixture of melted butter and "butter blend". The did half and half for monetary reasons. I would personally not use it if/when I open my restaurant. They hardly used olive oil and when I tried to on the line i was borderline repremanded for doing so.

    At home I use olive oil, canola oil, or butter depending on whats cooking.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2012
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Using butter to finish a dish is the way to go.

    Petals.
     
  12. lomeinrain

    lomeinrain

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    Divooooo!
     
  13. curtispnw

    curtispnw

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    I use pure olive oil, not virgin, to much olive flavor, sometimes you have to try different brands of pure olive oil to get one with a mild flavor, or one you can afford, I also like to finish with butter, and have been called on it by some old Italian woman, who says you don't mix butter and olive oil, who care's what she says, I like the way it tastes
     
  14. rbandu

    rbandu

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    My selections vary greatly between work and home.  At the restaurant we mainly use canola for saute and frying.  That's a food cost thing.  Obviously if a pan sauce needs to be finished with butter, that is what we use; I'm not ever inclined to substitute margarine or a butter blend, even for table service.  If the people are told they're eating butter, they're eating just that.

    At home it's different; I use light olive oil for saute and searing most things; sometimes peanut oil or sesame oil, depends what I'm making.  I've also grown quite fond of avocado oil recently, however it does add a (pleasant, nutty almost) flavor to whatever you're cooking.  

    Canola oil originally wasn't meant to be consumed as food, it was designed to be a lubricant for machine parts.  If I had my way I'd be using safflower oil or something equivalent at work, however the owner insists upon certain things and as long as it's not outright detrimental to my customers' health, that's fine.
     
  15. layjo

    layjo

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    We use Pomace olive oil, canola oil for searing and combo with whole butter for saute and flavor.  We do however use the butter flavored vegetable oil on occasion when browning, searing as well ex.(cheese blintz) 
     
  16. curtispnw

    curtispnw

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    nebraskabeef

    My comment to your employer would be, assuming your serve Mid west corn fed beef, some of the best tasting, highest quality beef in the world, why would you want to serve it with any thing made with liquid margarine, possibly one of the lowest quality fats you could use?

    A comment about canola oil, I used to use in the fryers, because I thought it was good for you until reading about it on line, search it and read about it, you may want to never use it again, Someone at some point they did some very convincing marketing to make us believe it was good for you.
     
  17. ldc08

    ldc08

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    Were I work at we us butter-it and divo, we rarely use olive oil.
     
  18. michaelga

    michaelga

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    this is completely incorrect 
     
  19. michaelga

    michaelga

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    this is also completely incorrect...
     
  20. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Seriously you read about these evils online?  The marketers wanted to get away from "Rape Seed Oil".  Honestly would  you even try to sell an oil named like that to the food industry?  

    Maybe the marketing that you read was done by the people selling you subsidized and heavily GMO'd corn oil... by the way don't plant any corn down wind of a Monsanto farm... you might end up owing them royalties!
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2012