Butchering

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by the greek, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. the greek

    the greek

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    Just Graduated From Culinary School
    Hello Chefs and Foodlovers!!!

     I have some questions about some cuts and their names in English language. 

    I am adding some photos  and i would like your help with them.

    Also i would like to ask you the name of Entrecote in English.

    Thank you for your time!!! Have a nice day!!





    The piece of meat in the last photo is the right side of the previous one!!
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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  3. chefross

    chefross

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    Entrecote as I understand it here in the USA is the whole strip loin (where strip steaks come from) devoid of all fat and sinew, usually roasted whole and served in thin slices.
     
  4. luc_h

    luc_h

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  5. the greek

    the greek

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    Thank you very much for your replies!!!

    I wasn't 100% sure that it's name is rib eye !!
     
  6. chef dell

    chef dell

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    alaminute likes this.
  7. chefross

    chefross

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    Ahh but you did not continue reading the Wikipedia definition:

    The term may also be used in France to denote the sirloin  cut properly known as a contre-filet,[1][2]  being the portion of the sirloin on the opposite side of the bone from the filet, or tenderloin. In English, a steak cut from the contre-filet  may be called a Porterhouse steak  (as the term is understood in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom), a sirloin steak, a strip steak, a striploin steak, a wing steak, a club steak, a Delmonico steak, or a New York strip steak. (As well, if the contre-filet  is left on the bone with the filet, the entire steak is called a Porterhouse steak  (as the term is understood in the United States and Canada) or a T-bone steak.)
     
  8. luc_h

    luc_h

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    I did read the full Wiki but more importantly the French version (which is considered a draft so less reliable) https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrecôte

    and this French reference: http://www.la-viande.fr/cuisiner-viande/cuisiner-boeuf/morceaux/entrecote-cote-boeuf

    I tried to strike the balance between trying to be concise and informative with my answers but being brief here did not seem to satisfy. I also try to give as much references as I can so that the OP can judge himself. I should have said the following:

    I am not a butcher nor a professional chef but I am French Canadian and have heard the term used in French often (although it's more and old school term)

    Entrecôte literally means between the ribs in French. Obviously, it is not possible to cut a steak out from between the ribs, what it actually means is a steak cut away from (underneath) the ribs. This could mean a slew of cuts as the English wiki is referring, but in French it should not refer to any steak that has a bone nor to any muscle attached to the floating ribs (i.e. contre-filet). That said few steak choices are left so I suggested ribeye. This is another example of a French (culinary) word that has changed from it's original meaning when used in English hence the confusion.

    PS. My (petite) mother would order an Entrecôte in a restaurant because it meant that it was a small boneless rib steak sliced thinner than one rib (meaning between the thickness of a rib) but I did not find that definition.

    hope that helps to clarify my answer?

    Luc H.
     
  9. chefross

    chefross

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    Thank you for your explanation. I would guess then that the French Chef I worked for simply chose that cut of beef (Strip Sirloin) and used it as "his" Entrecote.

    That's why I love this forum. You can learn so much from others, and give your own knowledge to share. Again....Thanks
     
  10. luc_h

    luc_h

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    Community cooperation is indeed grand!!

    Luc H.