burst or split bread loaves.

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I'm teaching myself how to make some simple standard loaves of bread. I've made eggbread loaves twice already and they still burst/split on the side. I know it's not the seam coming undone, and I am not overscaling. Each loaf is scaled at 18 oz.The texture of the bread is good and very soft and light(recipe uses oil instead of butter), but something's off and it's probably my shaping technique. Or maybe I over/under kneaded? This is making me very upset because I make really good focaccia and rolls, and know what a properly kneaded dough looks and feels like, yet I cannot produce a beautiful simple loaf of bread.

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated!
 
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I think that what Ribbony is asking - using American vocabulary - if you are slashing your loaves. That procedure may help alleviate bursting.
 
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I'm not so sure "slashing" would help. I make braided egg loaves [Challah] from time to time which doesn't require slashing.

Could be your shaping technique or overproofing. But I suspect the culprit may be somewhere else. Do you use bread pans?
What's the oven temperature for your egg loaves, Angrychef? Are you following a recipe? I think I need to know more about your technique! Can you share?


:eek:

[ July 25, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 
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You are probably underproofing the loaves. It's a delicate balance of letting them expand to the right point, without letting them go beyond the point where they won't have any more push left in the oven. If they are underproofed, they will generate enough gas to bulge. If they are overproofed, the gluten network has expanded beyond it's ability to hold it's shape. Then they will collapse. One more thing you can do with a braided challah, or any other braided bread. Dust the ropes with rye flour before you braid them and they won't grow together.
 
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One other thing to consider is that you may be forming your loaves too tightly. When shaping dough, you are essentially, wrapping a smooth skin of dough around a greater mass to obtain a certain shape. If that outer layer of dough is too tight, or has too much packed tightly within it , it stretches (being moist and elastic) during the proofing process as the greater mass of dough expands. But, when exposed to the heat of the oven that outer layer hardens before the inner layer heats up, expands and achieves its own "oven-kick" rise. Thus, the outer crust splits and inner dough pushes through.
Slashing can help and is always a good step to take, but try shaping your loaves and rolls a little more loosely.
Many new bread bakers work their dough so much during the shaping process they actually give it an unneccesary extra knead making the gluten stronger.
I hope these tips may help and happy baking.
 
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could be a few reasons

1- your oven is to hot. that is the more likely reason. thats where most inexperianced bread bakers go wrong.

2- slashing. when you slash bread, it allows air to escape just enough where it wont burst on top.

3- over proofing. this is an idea but it doesnt really make since to me beacue when over proofed, it will loose oven spring

4- your seems was on top or on the side. it must be on the bottom.


try a lower oven.

let us know.

thanks
 
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Thanks for the replies.
I made them in standard bread pans, 9" x 5". My recipe used eggyolks and oil. It produced excellent tasting bread and the texture was really good too, but I think the amount of eggyolks and oil did not provide enough structure for the entire loaf, because when they were on the cooling rack the sides caved in a bit. The person that gave me the recipe said it's meant for braided loaves. I did not slash the tops. The place where we get our eggbread never slashes theirs, and this is what I am trying to copy. Our ovens do not have steam, but I did spray the tops of the loaves with water and then once more while in the oven. Bake them at 350F. I think Bighat may be right about the underproofing. Evevn though I thought they had proofed enough, their oven spring was pretty high and then they started bursting. The seam was face down and did not come undone. They still made great bread pudding!
 
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Just a guess, I would not spray water on the bread nor in the oven. You probably should bake them on the middle rack of the oven at 375 degrees F. Careful not to underproof or overproof.

If that doesn't work, I would try braiding, just to see.

My Challah:
2 packages active dry yeast
1/4 - 1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups warm water
5 - 6 cups bread flour
2 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
1/4 cup unsalted butter
Handful of sesame or poppy seeds
Cornmeal for dusting

Is your recipe along the same lines?

:confused:

[ July 27, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 
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Maybe your flour is too weak and/or you're not developing the gluten enough. So the strands aren't strong enough to withstand the CO2.
 
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Thanks Kimmie. Yeah, my recipe is somewhere along those lines.
Momoreg, I did use bread flour but I have a feeling I did not knead the dough well enough last time. Good point to bring up. I will try again on Monday.
 
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I made 6 loaves of bread today, all coming out perfect and wonderful.I'm really pleased. I used an eggbread recipe with more whole eggs and less yolks, still used oil.
Thanks everyone for the help. :)
 

isa

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Good for you AC! You know I took Nancy Silverton's advice on having a bread notebook, you might want to try it to note things like kneading time and what the loaf looks like when it's out of the oven. Helps you to avoid making the same mistake twice.
 
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I don't know if i helped but I'm very happy for you, Angrychef.

Did you braid or use a pan?

:D
 
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So we can assume that whole eggs are a must!
Again, I'm very happy it turned out okay. Good for you.

:D
 
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The addition of whole eggs, rather than yolks, seems to jive with what I read in Bread Builders. Sufficient moisture, both in the dough and in the oven, is crucial to the formation of a good crust. If there is not enough moisture in either the crust is prone to cracking or blowing out. The whole eggs would add more moisture to the dough, wouldn't they?
 
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Thanks Kyle for the great scientific explanation. I guess you're avidly reading «The Bread Builders»! Any recipes in it or just great stuff helping us to find solutions to our baking problems?

:rolleyes:
 
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OR, It can simply be your eggwash is to strong. If to strong, crust forms and dries to early blowing out the sides..this bread talk is making me hungry, fresh skillet out of the oven in back,goat cheese, roma tomatoes, basil and pesto. Wish you all were here. I must take a picture of the crew, All hispanic enjoying this snack with corona.Not one jalapeno to be found!
 
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There isn't a recipe in the book! That's what's cool about it. When you're reading it you aren't tepmted to skip the reading and get right to the recipes. I am actually reading it! And re-reading :)
 
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