Burning food as a cooking technique?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by french fries, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. french fries

    french fries

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    And I mean BURNT, not just caramelized! I was visiting a page on Asian food and stumbled about this beautiful picture of a burnt coconut dessert: 


    I'm wondering, what other examples are there of burning ingredients to cook? 

    I've often heard of using burnt onions for stock, but have never tried it myself. 

     
  2. deepsouthnyc

    deepsouthnyc

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    The 'onion brulee' is quite popular in the french stock known as marmite, not to be confused with the bottled product. The burned onion has made its way into other Asian soup bases mainly for color, the flavor is not very noticeable in the final product.  

    There are many applications for charred food now-a-days. It wouldn't be crazy to see these 'burned' items end up in a salsa. 

    Here is a link to an article  from a couple of years ago about the trend of ash/charred food. 

    http://www.chow.com/food-news/70791/literally-hot-trend-chefs-putting-ash-on-food/
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've seen it in Chinese cuisine for a scorched garlic and spinach. Quite good with steamed fish.


    I'll soon add the spinach as this garlic isn't quite done yet. This is mostly about the scented oil from this process.

    And the scorching of the onion and ginger for pho. 
     
  4. ordo

    ordo

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    I use the burning technique sometimes. For instance, when doing pork hands in Chinese mother sauce, i literally burn the hands over the stove:


    Burnt:


    Then you scrap the burnt skin and proceede:

     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  5. teamfat

    teamfat

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    When grilling pineapple I usually let one side get awfully close to burnt.  I like it that way.

    mjb.
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Would you count charring peppers? You remove the skin, but the flavor is undeniable.
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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  8. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I like grilled fruit.


    After the peach halves were soft, I put them on the plate cut side up, sprinkled blue cheese crumbles on them then a drizzle of balsamic.

    mjb.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    Oooh that does sound really good as well. 

    I recently saw a restaurant where they grilled avocados, and I've meant to try that ever since. 
     
  10. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Don't forget the ever popular Durkee Charcoal Seasoning ....  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/31086/durkee-charcoal-seasoning

    My comments last  year about how things come in cycles.
    Add to that the myriad of native or 'primative' methods to cook food -

    - bury in ashes, steaks cooked on red-hot coals, planking, etc.

    It is just something that has fallen out of favor... and is now making a comeback.

    Hell Burn't ends are a familiar favourite from BBQ brisket and they definately should have some 'burned' bits on them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  11. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    A bean and lamb dish in the oven. Push the darkening surface back in the sauce a few times and the taste multiplies.

     
  12. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    There is a cheese on the market I believe from France which is like a torte made by alternating layers of burned vegetable ashes and a semi soft cheese. The exact name escapes me but it is delicious. I used to buy it in large wedges at Costco.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  13. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Ed, could the cheese you refer to be "Morbier"? It has indeed a thin layer of ashes in the middle.

    Sharp thinking, Ed! And now you mentioned it, there are also quite a lot of artisanal goat cheeses on the market that are rolled in ashes too.
     
  14. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Black? Not really. Red with some black "dust" would be a better description.