Burma teak care

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by bughut, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. bughut

    bughut

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    In my new kitchen i am lucky to have Burma teak worktops. They come from the veterany college in Edinburgh when they were dismantling the laboratory benches. The teak was being thrown out!!!!  Its at least 140 years old and im hoping you guys can help me look after it...Its goin to get splashed with all sorts and although i know it can take it, id like to protect it as much as i can without resorting to oil or varnish.

    I've had a large Burma teak chopping board sunk into my worktop in Dundee for the past 10 years or so and havnt had to treat it attall, but this is next to the stove and its going to get messed up much more. 

    Look forward to all suggestions
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
  2. rat

    rat

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    A – A clean, damp rag.B – A fine sanding block. Fine as in not so coarse. Not as in NKOTB fine. You could easily substitute the block with fine sandpaper. This is if the wood needs some light resurfacing.C – Mineral oil. Home improvement stores sell versions specifically marketed towards wood countertops but I buy my mineral oil in the laxative aisle of the grocery store. It’s a lot cheaper, works great and is safe. Plus, we eat directly off the countertop to keep our family regular, if you know what I mean. Just kidding. Not really.D – Oiling rags. These are just old rags that I’ve dedicated to the sole purpose of oiling the butcher block. I don’t wash them for fear of messing up my washer {they get very saturated!} but instead keep them in a plastic Ziploc bag under the sink just for this purpose. No, they don’t stink. Mineral oil has no odor.To routinely oil the countertops I…1 – Wipe all dirt, dust, crumbs and stickiness from the butcher block with my damp rag. I let it air dry for a few minutes.2 - Drizzle some mineral oil on the butcher block. I don’t measure it but if I had to guess I’d say I use about 1/3 cup.3 – Rub oil into the countertop with my oiling rag, following the wood grain. Don’t forget the vertical edges!4 – Let the oil penetrate and soak in for 24-48 hours. I try to remind my kids that the island is greasy to keep them from getting into it, but they sometimes forget. No biggie. The oil won’t hurt them. If I’m impatient, I’ll wipe away excess oil with a dry cloth but I really like to let it sit for a day or two to really soak in. The wood drinks it up and loves it. I’m always amazed by how revitalized it looks after each oiling. Like new!
     
  3. rat

    rat

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    Also making furniture is a hobby of mine, what you can do to build up more of a permanent sheen is use boiled linseed oil. Over time with regular light applications the polymers in the oil will cross link and make a nice shine. Don't use commercial boiled oil because of the additives.
     
  4. bughut

    bughut

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    I'm so impressed with the mineral oil rat. Thank you for the info. I've used it for the past 2 weeks on my teak chopping board and can't wait to try it on the worktops. OH is well impressed too.
     
  5. rat

    rat

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    PLease post pictures!
     
  6. bughut

    bughut

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    My photography doesnt do it justice, I'm really impressed

    The second pic is with the under cabinet light on, which shows the grain off nicely. It also shows up the well worn front half much darker. I guess thats simply years of use.   The sealant needs replacing anyway, as you can see, so Ill get it turned round and start using the back portion. Its just screwed in from the underside of the worktop, so no problem.

    BTW rat, I said earlier id used mineral oil. Should've read boiled linseed oil...I couldnt find the mineral stuff. 

    I'm officially a thicko !!  I've just re-read your post and i've stupidly put on the very thing you advised not to. I know i was impatient to get on with the job at the time. I'll hunt down the mineral oil and start again.
     
  7. rat

    rat

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    You can use alcohol to remove the boiled linseed. If you can find flaxseed oil you can boil it yourself (that's what boiled linseed oil is really) Do that outside though. Flaxseed oil is the best to season cast iron pans also. That is some great looking teak~!!!
     
  8. bughut

    bughut

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    Thanks for not making me feel more of a plonker than I do already. It's serendipitous that u asked for pics just before we go back to France, where I would have made a humungus error by soaking the two work tops in the wrong stuff. Ill get it right and take close up pics the day we leave. I'm so looking forward to the transformation on the grand scale. Thank you for all your input rat. I hadn't appreciated what I had till you did.

    Cheers

    Bug
     
  9. rat

    rat

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    Happy to help, I just finished a set of nesting tables and will be using the linseed oil finish on them, it takes about a month to do it right and get enough finish built up, and then once a month for a year then once a year until your grankids take over the job. I also find quite often old cutting boards, a quick trip through the surface planer and they look new, oiled with the mineral oil, they make great gifts lol.
     
  10. bughut

    bughut

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    Great idea rat.

    I very much like your signature btw. I'm adopting it if you don't mind - in french though. Id use it for CT if i didnt enjoy my own so much. colour me daft, but i get a giggle every time i read it... Yeah, I know, im daft

    Can we see your tables?
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013