Buffalo Osso Bucco

4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
I'm doing a Wine dinner Next week, The client is going to serve some older Gaja Borolas and Barbarescos.

He wants the dinner to be elegant,but he wants the food to be different,yet simple.

I'm thinking about doing a Buffalo Osso Bucco braised in Barbara,maybe gorganzola soft polenta and braised baby fennel to bring out the soft anise of the Sori Tildon and Sori Sans Lorenzo he'll be pouring.

I've made Osso Bucco a million times,but not with Buffalo.

Has any one done this before?
 
12
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Joined May 10, 2002
Cape Chef I have had the pleasure of using Buffalo it is no diffrent than beef, but it does seem to be more leaner than what
I have worked with in the past. I bought whole Ribeye they were a bit pricey,about $12.00 a pound if I recall right. The meat was a bit chewy,but the flavor was better than beef go figure. Never bought the shanks I,m willing to bet they are pricey also.good luck
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Hi Oskar,

I have prepared Buffalo many times and really enjoy it.

Stews,burgers,1 by 1 and tenderlions (good chili also)

The shanks are $4.59 a # so my raw food cost per plate is about $6.00.
 
818
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Joined Oct 13, 2001
Hey Cape , I would add just a little fat to the dish as Buffalo is much leaner . Just enough to give that silky feeling in the mouth , and that richness . I would go with butter .
Let us know how it goes dude . Doug...........................
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Thanks Doug,

The shanks are about 65%-35% with excellent marberling,so where would you introduce the butter to the dish?
TIA
 
1,065
28
Joined Dec 8, 1999
The only thing I could add is to stick around while they are being braised if you're not actually braising them yourself. You know how sometimes braised meats will sometimes get a dry, almost mealy mouthfeel if they're braised too long? Buffalo, as lean as it is, I think would be especially susceptible to this.

Regarding the butter, perhaps resting the shanks in beurre monte (ala Keller) would give the effect Doug is talking about.
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Hey Greg,

I don't know how Keller uses Beurre Monte (I use it to butter poach) (almost only seafood)slowly basting the butter on low heat otherwise it breaks.

I'm not sure I would make a Beurre Monte and rest a shank on it,this sauce should not need butter to enhance it and there should be enough marrow to offer the mouthfeel I desire

Example

Brad

Food Forum Moderator
Member # 1938

posted December 30, 2002 09:17 PM
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One quick note,lobster should not be boiled as the direct contact with the water makes them tough as by drawing out it's moisture.

A whole lobster is best steamed above a flavorful court boullion.

In your case your probably dealing with African or South American tails (one being salt and the other fresh water)

A nice way to prepare these type of lobsters is to butter baiste them buy slowly melting butter in a deep sided saute pan with some shallots to add flavor to the butter and add the split (not cut in half) tails, season with a bit of kosher salt and crushed pink peppercorns and over medium heat literally baste them with the warm butter by tilting the pan to collect the fat and using a spoon pour it over the flesh,this will take sometime but it's worth the effort. On occasion turn the tails over to ensure even cooking.

When your tails are cooked remove them and cover tightly with foil to keep warm,then deglaze your pan with a touch of sparkling wine and fresh tarragon,a squeeze of lemon and reduce by half.

Just nape the sauce over the meat and dig in.

--------------------
Brad Stabinsky

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818
16
Joined Oct 13, 2001
Hey cape , with your fat to protien ratio , including the great marbeling , your food will be a hit without the introduction of any more fat . Question ? Where do you get your Buffalo from ?
Also your Lobster post is so accurate . Split , steam , reservre , make sauce and enjoy . My question about the Buffalo comes from the fact that all I have ever been privy to cooking was either ground or from a supposed hunt . Very good but very lean .
TIA . Doug........................................
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Hi Doug,

Mostly from Wyoming,some from Montana.

I just have to say Doug you are such a diplomat and obviously a king person.

All you posts are thoughtful and kind.
 
1,065
28
Joined Dec 8, 1999
Among other uses, Keller rests his roasted meats in beurre monte before serving. Resting a braised shank in it was just a suggestion as to how to introduce the use of butter, I've always held shanks in the sauce they are to be served in myself.
 
818
16
Joined Oct 13, 2001
Thanks cape and back at ya dude . Please post the results of your event as this sounds like a good one to replicate ;) . Remember that plagerism is the most sincere of compliments .
Clear skies , Doug.....................
 
82
10
Joined May 9, 2003
Hey Cape,
Sounds like a winner to me. Everyone has good point already. The only thing I would add is...
When braising or confiting I like to to take the whole pot, protein, stock (or fat) and all and cool it in the liquid. Slightly reheat to remove and do whatever you need to to make the sauce. I had trouble with some things (cheeks and duck confit) removing them to cool...they seemed to dry out a little and this has prevented it. You can get it extra tender this way as well as you don't have to worry about it falling off the bone while removing hot.

Very curious as to the results...please post when convienient.
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Kelly,

I always keep my braised/confited items in there liquid/fat when cooling.Since the fat has all been rendered oxidation happens quickly and hermedictly sealed (sp?) is best.

The dish came out excellent,very tender and moist,deep flavor and rich. The wines where incredible.The buffalo offered up a great deal of marrow from the shank bone that was wonderful.
 

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