Brown Garlic?

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I know of black garlic, maybe this is similar. A single large clove of garlic got essential kicked under a counter, for goodness knows how long. And when I finally stumbled upon it much of the outer flesh had turned brown and a bit distorted. On a whim I decided to use it and was surprised and the caramel-like flavor, which I rather liked. I know have a handful of cloves sitting in the same spot to see how they develop. I put a slit in the skin of each as that is how I found the original clove. I forgot the date I did this, but i'd say it's been several months, no big change yet.

Anyone ever fool around with this?
 
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Hmm... uncontrolled decomposition as a preparation method? No, I haven't tried that (on purpose). Have you searched around on the web to find out whether this is a known ingredient type? I'm wondering whether some kind of slow-dried preserved garlic might be a thing, and then you'd just have to find out what the standard methods are for producing it.
 
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Garlic that has gone bad can cause botulism. Its very rare, but, it does happen. The bacteria that cause botulism typically form inactive spores in a low acid environment like garlic. Under certain conditions, these spores can become active.

The incubation period for botulism averages between 12-72 hours or up to 8 days depending on the dosage of the bacteria. In some cases, botulism can develop as early as 2 hours after ingestion.

While thorough cooking to at least 70'C (158'F) will kill botulism bacteria, it will not kill the spores. That can only be done through a specific sterilization process that requires the exposure of the spores to a temperature of 121'C (249'F) for three minutes or more.

The risk here, although quite small, would be any inactive botulism spores becoming active after they have been ingested. Stomach acid does nothing to kill the spores and once they are in the intestinal tract, they can become active and cause serious illness.

Again, the chances that you will contract botulism from eating this garlic is rather slim. But, nevertheless, a risk. For whatever its worth, I don't think repeating the browned garlic is a good idea.

Cheers! :)
 
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So what is the difference between doing this and making black garlic? It does seem about the same thing, except I believe the other is done at somewhat warmer temperature, and in a couple weeks or so.

This was not the typical rot as I've seen described in a google search. They clove wasn't translucent, waxy or slimy. Also garlic does have very powerful antibacterial properties that are activated when cell get ruptured, as I would suppose happen during this sort of process. I'll try to dig up more on this before using it again of course.
 
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As far as I know, you need anaerobic conditions for botulism to become a problem.
Hence, there may be a problem with garlic in oil, but I don't think there would be a risk in this case.
 
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As far as I know, you need anaerobic conditions for botulism to become a problem.
Hence, there may be a problem with garlic in oil, but I don't think there would be a risk in this case.
Only the bacteria, which develop from spores, require an anaerobic environment to develop and survive. The spores themselves, however, exist widely throughout the environment and can develop quite rapidly in warm, low acidity situations. The problem with the garlic, as with any food that decomposes in an uncontrolled manner, is its low acidity and exposure to ideal temperatures for those spores to develop. The spores are consumed and can easily germinate into bacteria in the relatively low oxygen environment of the digestive system and cause the person who eats to get botulism.

There is a risk, and as I stated, that risk is small. I don't think anyone who handles food either at home or professionally should get into the habit of taking risks with food borne illnesses no matter how small that risk, especially with illnesses that are known to be fatal. :)
 
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OK, here's the thing, I know spores can't generate by themselves or do anything else in that state, they have to first have the conditions to change to an active bactrerial state. From Harvard Med:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/botulism-a-to-z
"You can be exposed to the bacteria causing botulism in several ways, the most familiar being by eating contaminated food. In most food-borne cases of botulism in adults, home-canned foods are responsible. The bacteria that cause botulism exist in dirt and dust as a spore, but this form is inactive and does not produce toxin. When a spore is moved into a low-oxygen environment, however, such as an enclosed jar or can, it can reproduce and make its dangerous toxin."
 
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I guess Im not understanding what you're trying to say here. I think we all can agree that botulism can grow and develop in the anaerobic environment of a can. However, contaminated canned products are not the only delivery method of live, virile botulism spores into the human body. Since those spores exist in significant quantities in the environment, its entirely feasible they can find their way to the decomposing garlic and exist quite nicely until they are introduced to the necessary conditions. Those condition for them to become active can be any anaerobic environment such a food can or the large or small intestines.
 
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The only point is that the spores can be found anywhere, exist anywhere, and the fermenting garlic should be no more harmful than any other garlic clove.
 
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Agreed......under controlled conditions. But, the OP was not talking about controlled conditions in his post. He was talking about a clove of garlic he found decomposing under a counter. If the garlic was allowed to decompose under controlled conditions in a manner similar to the beef aging process, then, I would agree with you 100%. :)
 

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