Brioche Goubard

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by woods, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. woods

    woods

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    Hello. Is anyone familiar with this form of brioche cake? It is briefly described in Larousse Gastronomique but I would like to find more details both in technique and history. Thanks. Woods
     
  2. panini

    panini

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    Woods,
    Sorry no one has had any information. I will have my wife ask in her weekly call to family in Paris.
    I'm not familiar with it, it's a very old name. It could be named after someone.
    pan
     
  3. woods

    woods

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    Thanks Panini,

    I had a feeling that would be the case. Maybe if I can ever peruse a 18th or 19th century baking book I might get lucky.

    Woods
     
  4. zukerig

    zukerig

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    JWoods, I notice that you had posted a similar inquiry a couple of months ago on the Meilleur du Chef forum!

    I believe it’s an admirable ambition to go into the baking attic to search out antique recipes, dust them off, and update them for re-creating in modern kitchens. In my edition of Larousse Gastronomique, the item in question is captioned under the photo as “Brioche Goubard.” However, in the body-text it is referred to as “Brioche Goubaud.” Slight difference in the spelling, but which of the two is most authentic?

    Traditionally, brioches have been cornerstones of boulangeries: “Mauvaise brioche, mauvaise maison,” say the French!

    The preparation of this brioche seems quite straightforward, at least according to the method outlined in Larousse. You’ll need a standard, unfluted (buttered) flan ring in which to fit the first portion of brioche dough. I think the primary consideration is what you’re going to use for a “salpiçon of preserved fruit.” My suggestion is that you either purchase a jar of premium, imported fruit from France or Italy. (The ultimate I’ve eaten is produced by La Salamandre in France; they market superb prunes in Armagnac & Mirabelle plums in a fruit-based eau-de-vie.) Last year I made a batch of scones filled with Italian Morello-cherry preserves. I chose to use preserves (rather than jam or a fruit spread) because it contained fruit particles and was less syrupy.

    Alternatively, make your own salpiçon. The brilliant Jacques Pépin has offered a delectable blueberry-plum adaptation:
    http://www.wchstv.com/gmarecipes/phylotartfrui.shtml

    In pursuit of old French cookery books, you may contact owner M. G. Baudon at this Parisian bookstore:

    Librairie Gourmande
    4, rue Dane
    75005 Paris
    Tel: 33-43-54-37-27
    Fax: 33-43-54-31-16