bread wont rise

1
10
Joined Aug 8, 2010
hi all, this will be my first post on this wonderful site. I have been trying this new bread with the following ingredients.

3 liter lukewarm water

100ml vegetable oil

100g yeast

50g salt

5 kg bakery's flour

the problem i have is that when i leave the bread to proof, its proofs but..

1) it does not rise well to a normal size

2) when put in the oven the dough sinks.

how can i increase the size of the bread and stop it form sinking when put in the oven
 
1,310
15
Joined Dec 4, 2001
I would say that there isn't enough yeast (and I'm assuming you are using active dry yeast??). For 5kg flour you only have 0.02% yeast and it should be closer to 0.1% - that is 400g - 500g. That would be for American yeast. Where you are the yeast proportions may be different but in any case, I still think there isn't enough.
 
8,550
207
Joined Feb 13, 2008
To put in familiar US measurements, that's about 10 tbs of yeast for about 10 "1 pound" loaves, the amount of yeast is right down the middle and is not the problem.

Either the yeast proofs but is tired nonethelees, or the issue is somewhere in the mixing, kneading, the temperature for the first rise, or the amount of time allowed.  I don't know where, but Kumar didn't describe the method.  So, how could I?

Don't make us guess,

BDL

PS.  Jock, your calculations are off by two orders of magnitude.  100g = 2% of 5kg, while 500g = 10% of 5kg. 

Your recommended 0.1% would be 5 grams, the equivalent of a rounded tea spoon.  Probably not enough for more than 10 lbs of flour unless you (a) had some major time to kill, and (b) enjoyed a pleasantly sour tang.
 
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294
15
Joined May 20, 2009
Weight-wise we need to clarify instant, dried or compressed...only for ease of reading as we're all assuming dried. Doesn't dry get subbed at about 1/2 the weight?

http://www.kitchensavvy.com/journal/2007/02/

Dried also has a shelf-life before & after opening beyond which might produce these results...'tired' as BDL suggests.

The sinking is probably just the result of the first problem ie texture is unable to support its own weight.
 
 
1,310
15
Joined Dec 4, 2001
PS.  Jock, your calculations are off by two orders of magnitude.  100g = 2% of 5kg, while 500g = 10% of 5kg. 

Your recommended 0.1% would be 5 grams, the equivalent of a rounded tea spoon.  Probably not enough for more than 10 lbs of flour unless you (a) had some major time to kill, and (b) enjoyed a pleasantly sour tang.
You are right of course. My mental arithmetic isn't what it used to be!!
 
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