Bread proofing

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by stargazer2123, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. stargazer2123

    stargazer2123

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    I am making a pain de champagne. I use a starter, I knead it for 10 min, let it rise for 2 hrs and then shape and proof for 1 1/2 hrs in a bread basket (before that I didn't use a bread basket and it just proofed wide). Now with the basket it has a nice shape, but as soon as I take it out it starts to sink. I've gotten good at throwing it in oven before it sinks too much. What am I doing wrong that it won't retain it's shape?

    Here is the recipe

    1tsp dry yeast

    1 cup water

    1/2  c. Rye flour 

    2 1/3 c. Bread flour

    1 1/2 tsp salt

    1 c. Starter

    I live in Texas and it's about 76-78 degrees in the house. I used HEB brand
    bread flour.

    The starter started with 2tsp dry yeast, 1 1/4 c. Water 2 c. Bread flour. I feed it with 1 c. Bread flour and 1/2 c. Water either every two weeks or when I make bread. When I make bread usually uses most of it, just enough to mix in some more flour and water.

    I knead it 10 min in a stand mixer, it usually comes out a little sticky.

    The bread basket is an 8in fielding brotform, I think it's a good size compared to the risen and punched down dough.

    It stays deflated in the oven, and I think would sink more if the sides of the cookie sheet stop it. I don't do the finger poke test...what is the finger poke test?

    I think I answered all the questions! I think the bread is denser than it should be.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2012
  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Reference and recipe, please. 

    Ten years experience.

    -T
     
  3. storandelli

    storandelli

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    Recipe would be nice and what kind of flour are you using. If it's falling down when you put it in the oven, it's a weak gluten structure, or it's over-proofed, which weakens the gluten structure also. Do you knead it by hand or do you use a mixer for 10 minutes. 10 minutes by hand may not be long enough to develop a strong dough, but 10 minutes in a mixer may over-mix the dough (it will probably be sticky in such a case). There are quit a few variables...weak flour (all purpose or whole wheat), Hydration (how much water in the dough), temperature (both rising and baking), kneading time...etc.

    Let us know more and we can help.

    ralphie
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    And with my 6C recipe using a poolish, the dough is kneaded about 10 seconds once mixed.  Gluten and sugars form overnight within the poolish btw.
     
  5. stargazer2123

    stargazer2123

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    Posted