Bread making book

31
0
Joined Feb 23, 2020
Hello.
Could anyone suggest me a bread making book? What is your favourite? I would like a cookbook with bread baking theory and recipes as well but not a begginer-like level. More of a intermediate level so there are more prospects for improvement.
 
2,516
1,121
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Bread science by Emily Buehler.
But whichever book you go for, check on which system it is based. For me, I grew up with the metric system. If you didn't, then make sure you go for a book that uses both metric and imperial.
 
510
81
Joined May 29, 2013
As far as a book, I would recommend Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice.

But, I would also strongly suggest you get the following equipment:

1. A digital scale or two. Bread baking is as much science as art and knowing the exact amount of ingredients can make a huge difference in the outcome. Flour can be loose or tight packed in a volume measurement, resulting in different quantities between different volume scoops. There can be no variance when you measure by weight.

The first scale I would get would measure by the gram, from one gram to 5000 grams (11 pounds), with the ability to tare the existing weight before adding anything additional. This is pretty much a stock-standard digital availability, due to existing mas-produced electronic circuitry. Unless you’re making bread for a commercial bakery, it should cover most small scale bread baking. You should be able to easily find something on eBay for less than $20. Look for one that uses standard AA or AAA batteries. I don’t want to bother with button batteries.

The second scale I would buy would be a sub-gram digital scale. I use one that measures from 1/100th of a gram to 500 grams. It's not an essential (like a wide-range digital scale), but is's really useful for small measurement quantities, especially for yeast and certain pastry work (where you may be measuring to significantly less than 1 gram). Again, I would only get something using AA or AAA batteries (no button batteries, please). I bought one on eBay for about $12 a few years back.

To check for accuracy, I use recently minted coins. Look up on your national mint’s web site for the individual weights of the various denominations, and check your scale’s figures for various combinations of coinage. My cost was literally a pocketful of change (replaceable).

2. Several oven thermometers. You want to check to see what temperatures are in your oven before you start. These are not expensive: I use six CDN oven thermometers (which cost $7 each), spaced out into a 2 x 3 pattern on an oven rack. I note what temperatures are shown on each thermometer and then re-arrange the thermometers, then repeat the process several times. I can then look for outlier readings and then average the results. I do this for various rack heights in the oven as well as for different temperatures. I then have a record to see what each thermometer shows for each location in my oven. I will then truly know my oven.

3. An el cheapo hand calculator. This is very valuable for working out Baker’s percentages. I use one from a dollar store. It even has a built-in solar cell.

4. A notebook and a pen. These are truly THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS! You will find that these measurements and the notes you take will make the biggest difference in your breadbaking.

Hope that helps.

GS
 
31
0
Joined Feb 23, 2020
As far as a book, I would recommend Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice.

But, I would also strongly suggest you get the following equipment:

1. A digital scale or two. Bread baking is as much science as art and knowing the exact amount of ingredients can make a huge difference in the outcome. Flour can be loose or tight packed in a volume measurement, resulting in different quantities between different volume scoops. There can be no variance when you measure by weight.

The first scale I would get would measure by the gram, from one gram to 5000 grams (11 pounds), with the ability to tare the existing weight before adding anything additional. This is pretty much a stock-standard digital availability, due to existing mas-produced electronic circuitry. Unless you’re making bread for a commercial bakery, it should cover most small scale bread baking. You should be able to easily find something on eBay for less than $20. Look for one that uses standard AA or AAA batteries. I don’t want to bother with button batteries.

The second scale I would buy would be a sub-gram digital scale. I use one that measures from 1/100th of a gram to 500 grams. It's not an essential (like a wide-range digital scale), but is's really useful for small measurement quantities, especially for yeast and certain pastry work (where you may be measuring to significantly less than 1 gram). Again, I would only get something using AA or AAA batteries (no button batteries, please). I bought one on eBay for about $12 a few years back.

To check for accuracy, I use recently minted coins. Look up on your national mint’s web site for the individual weights of the various denominations, and check your scale’s figures for various combinations of coinage. My cost was literally a pocketful of change (replaceable).

2. Several oven thermometers. You want to check to see what temperatures are in your oven before you start. These are not expensive: I use six CDN oven thermometers (which cost $7 each), spaced out into a 2 x 3 pattern on an oven rack. I note what temperatures are shown on each thermometer and then re-arrange the thermometers, then repeat the process several times. I can then look for outlier readings and then average the results. I do this for various rack heights in the oven as well as for different temperatures. I then have a record to see what each thermometer shows for each location in my oven. I will then truly know my oven.

3. An el cheapo hand calculator. This is very valuable for working out Baker’s percentages. I use one from a dollar store. It even has a built-in solar cell.

4. A notebook and a pen. These are truly THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS! You will find that these measurements and the notes you take will make the biggest difference in your breadbaking.

Hope that helps.

GS

Oh, thanks for taking the time to help me. Thank you all, but since everyone recommends a different book i guess that all of them are good. It's just yourself and how you will read them and execute the recipes properly.
 
2,516
1,121
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Pretty much so ;)
Check the titles out on Amazon and you can read some of the pages.
I got a number of baking books and I like most, but for different reasons.
Just beware that different bakers have different methods. That confused me gor a while
 
13
11
Joined Dec 1, 2015
Hello.
Could anyone suggest me a bread making book? What is your favourite? I would like a cookbook with bread baking theory and recipes as well but not a begginer-like level. More of a intermediate level so there are more prospects for improvement.
I always check my local library to see if they have the cookbook that I am considering to buy before I make the actual purchase. If I like what the cookbook has to offer, I buy it and if not, I don’t buy it. This has saved me a lot of money over the years and I end up with cookbooks that I really use and love.
 
13
11
Joined Dec 1, 2015
Before I buy a cookbook, I check to see if it is available at my local library. If it is available, I can look thru it and decide whether or not I want to buy it. This has saved me a lot of money over the years and I end up with cookbooks that I will really use and love. My local library has almost every cookbook that I wanted to audition.
 
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