Braising eye of round beef cut

615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
What I am looking for:

     A braising recipe that someone has used and produces a good result - tender meat, well-flavored sauce

What I am NOT looking for:

     Opinions about not using eye of round

     Discussions of sous vide

     Opinions about roasting or other cooking methods of eye of round.

Thanks
 
Last edited:
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
Because a thing seems difficult for you, do not think it impossible  for anyone to accomplish. – Marcus Aurelius

:)
 
4,199
1,089
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Hi Marcus! I know this is a stupid question, but did you google that? Not too many people would braise that piece o meat so I won't be holding my breath waiting for a tried and true recipe. I surely wouldn't so I haven't one to offer either. But according to Google President Ford had a fondness for braised round eye and so do some folks in the Deep South. Check it out, one of those options may resonate and inspire you to accomplish the impossible.
 
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
@BrianShaw  

I did Google it and there certainly are a plethora of choices.  Many of them seem plausible but I figured I would throw it out to the forum.

I do know that having braised this before, it can be dry by the time it is tender, likely explaining why our grandmothers served it with gravy, buttered spuds and buttered rolls.  I have had some success with letting the meat cool overnight in the liquid.  It seems to reabsorb some of it and becomes a bit more moist.

I'm thinking it almost has to be like pot au feu.

Just figured I would throw it out to the forum but I was hoping not to get de-railed into the 347th conversation about sous-vide.

:)
 
Last edited:
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
Curse you, you sous vide demon!   May your spun sugar shatter!

Ok, is everyone happy now?  Someone said "sous vide".  Anyone mentioning it again clearly has nothing to offer.
 

cerise

Banned
1,008
33
Joined Jul 5, 2013
I'd either try Jerry Fords recipe or sous vide it. Sorry, couldn't resist!
Stop following me around on Google, Brian. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif I was just looking at that recipe, when my Teppanyaki take-out dinged. How could mushrooms dancing in (Merlot or Marsala?) wine sauce, and served to a Pres. be bad. ;p. I might skip the cream though.  Sounds a little 80's imo.  Something to ponder and play with.

http://www.creekstonefarms.com/recipes/braised-eye-of-round-with-mushroom-merlot-sauce.html
 
Last edited:
4,199
1,089
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Oh yes I saw you over at Google. But that wasn't you I saw at Amazon looking at, ummmm, sue vee equipment was it?

Me... I just finished eating cheese and broccoli quiche that came from Costco. My wife's night to "cook". At least she used the oven instead of nuking it!
 
Last edited:
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
@Cerise    Cream sound a little 80's?  Maybe 1880's Escoffier, which is excellent.

My mom used to make a totally kitschy recipe with Lipton soup and other store staples but I can't find it.  She also added quite a bit of real sherry, not cooking sherry (barf).  It was actually pretty tender and nice over noodles but no one can find the recipe now that my mom is gone.  There are similar recipes on the intertubes but none sound quite the same.  Maybe the answer is back in my childhood.
 
2,838
644
Joined Jan 4, 2011
I don't sue veed anything. (I purposely spelled it wrong) It's a procedure that just takes too long for regular everyday people at home to do and it doesn't suit the type/style of cooking that I make the largest % of my $$$ income from. I braise a lot of meat. I don't think that "eye'o'round" needs the benefits of braising. I think that a good roasting, at a med-high temp, for the proper time depending on size, would be very nice ... and not take any different time than braising.

I would gently score a nice 1/4" (squares and depth) crosshatch on the outside, like a ham, for a nice flavorful crust, then season the bageebies out of it using my own choice (your own choice in this case) of seasonings and throw it in the refrigerator for a coupla hours until it is good and cold but not at all frozen. Into the oven it goes in a pan on a raised rack @ +/- 400* for an +/- 1-hour. Let it rest ... cut it up.

By putting it in cold, with the high heat, it cooks a nice crust on the outside but keeps a good amount of pink inside without having all the layers of grey-brown shade.
 
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
No roasting and here's my reason - I've tried it more than other methods and the result is always so-so.  At least with braising I can get soup or a sauce.
 
615
60
Joined Dec 1, 2015
@ChicagoTerry  

Well, I like to think of kitchen art and skill as much as kitchen science and if of all the things I've learned in the kitchen, inflexibility has not helped.  By inflexible, I mean to say "this cut of meat must ALWAYS be roasted".  I prefer honing skills and fine tuning, learning the intricacies of a method, a cut, a preparation.  Even making something suboptimal nourishing, enjoyable, maybe even a different way to stretch something.  I always enjoy discussing cooking, not just shutting down a topic.

I think I was politely clear at the beginning that I was not asking to be told to "roast it".  I was asking how someone on this thread might do it another way.  I assumed that people in this forum and these threads would enjoy lively discussions improving their skills.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
Any pot roast recipe will do, just make sure you make lots of sauce.  You can get it so that it falls apart although it won't be unctious and pleasant, but it will be tasty and edible.  

I wonder if this would braise better if it was butterflied and laced with pancetta or bacon.  
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
 
@ChicagoTerry  

Well, I like to think of kitchen art and skill as much as kitchen science and if of all the things I've learned in the kitchen, inflexibility has not helped.  By inflexible, I mean to say "this cut of meat must ALWAYS be roasted".  I prefer honing skills and fine tuning, learning the intricacies of a method, a cut, a preparation.  Even making something suboptimal nourishing, enjoyable, maybe even a different way to stretch something.  I always enjoy discussing cooking, not just shutting down a topic.

I think I was politely clear at the beginning that I was not asking to be told to "roast it".  I was asking how someone on this thread might do it another way.  I assumed that people in this forum and these threads would enjoy lively discussions improving their skills.
This is a forum of professional cooks and passionate home cooks.  We all have experience with this cut in various ways and have done our research through trial and error.  You may be in a stage where you want to experiment with this cut, but we've all been there already and there's no point in going back.  I'm actually very passionate about cheap cuts of meat and making them spectacular dishes worthy of a holiday table and have been through lots of trial and error stuff myself.  But when something doesn't work it just doesn't work, I don't need to make it over and over again in an attempt to reinvent the wheel.  Some cuts are better than others and I happen to love eye of round, it will make a tasty and edible pot roast but since I can just as easily and cheaply make it with chuck I get that because it is much much better/tastier.
 
4,199
1,089
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Well hold the phone! Sometimes it's the person who speaks the fewest words who can win the debate. That's not within my culinary traditions but it's making my mouth vater.

Es gut!
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top Bottom