bordelaise versions

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by toddlove8845, Oct 11, 2005.

  1. toddlove8845

    toddlove8845

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    Has anyone tried to make bordelaise sauce with unroasted bones. Instead doubling the amount of roasted beef scraps? It kind of makes sence because you would probably get more body to the sauce. You wouldnt roast away some of the goodness from the bones like cartilage.
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    IMO anything beef needs to be roasted or browned. Well, maybe not boiled beef dinner.

    In anycase, are you talking about the sauce or the garnish? The sauce is made with veal stock which is in made with roasted veal bones. There's really no substitute. Beef Bordelaise, OTOH, is served with a marrow garnish.
     
  3. toddlove8845

    toddlove8845

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    im talking about the sauce. I think you would get a better result without roasting the bones prior to making your veal stock.You would get nice color from the carmelized vegetables and tomato paste. As far as flavor doubling the amout of beef scraps you use should make it intence enough. Also without roasting the bone you would retain a lot of the cartilage. This is what i was thinking.

    1 make veal stock standard way veg tomato paste wine but unroasted bones
    2 strain veal stock
    3 roast beef scraps with a little more wine to deglaze
    4 add this to the veal stock and cook for a few hours
    5 strain
    6 reduce
    7 strain this time through cheese cloth
     
  4. dano1

    dano1

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    Try it and use whats best for you and your operation.

    I believe Keller does not brown off his bones for veal stock. Is it how i would do it?-no, but who am I :). A Chef i apprenticed with does not add tomato product to his veal stock, i do. There are very few absolutes-unless you're baking ;).

    Ya got to decide what works for you. Give it a try and let us know how it went.
     
  5. coffeekitten

    coffeekitten

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    I have learned the Maillard effect (or browning) occur with or without prebrowning the bones. It just depends on how long you simmer the bones for. As for if any cartilage is lost during roasting I do not know. :confused:

    Here is a bit more information on the Maillard Reaction:

    Hope this helps.
    Chocolate Kisses,
    CoffeeKitten
     
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Anyone here have veal blanquette? Heh... it's not bad. But really, the reason you roast the bones is you can eat the marrow!