Bordelaise Cooking

23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
I was wondering if anyone here has good knowledge of traditional Bordelaise cuisine and can answer some questions about it. I've tried doing some searches of the forum and did not find any relevant threads, so apologies if I have missed anything.

First, I am wondering what the traditional Bordelaise sides are for Entrecote Bordelaise (whether the rustic version which is just a garnish of shallots and marrow on the steak while grilling and the more familiar Marchand de Vin sauce)? I have Paula Wolfert's Cooking of Southwest France, which is a wonderful starting point, but there isn't much guidance on the correct sides. I paired the rustic version last weekend with Gratin Auvergnat (because beef and blue cheese), and Cepes a la Gasconne. They seemed to work wonderfully together, but I have no idea if it is remotely authentic.

Similarly, I am huge fan of Bordeaux wine and I understand that Pauillac lamb is considered the ultimate pairing for a serious Cabernet-based Medoc wine. However, I have no clue how said Pauillac lamb is prepared. Does anyone have any knowledge of the traditional recipes for Pauillac lamb or the correct accompaniments for same? Thanks for any help!
 
5,605
481
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Pauillac lamb is not a dish but an IGP (Protected Geographical Indication) from the Gironde department for a lamb that is raised purely with his mother's milk (no grass).

Gratin Auvergnat cannot possibly be an "authentic" side for entrecôte Bordelaise since Auvergne is a different region. There rarely is a specific "authentic" side dish for any French dishes as most of the dishes are meat oriented, so the cook is free to serve whatever vegetables are in season. With an Entrecôte Bordelaise you'd probably be served french fries most of the time, but there are many other side dishes that would work just as well.
 
23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
Pauillac lamb is not a dish but an IGP (Protected Geographical Indication) from the Gironde department for a lamb that is raised purely with his mother's milk (no grass).

Gratin Auvergnat cannot possibly be an "authentic" side for entrecôte Bordelaise since Auvergne is a different region. There rarely is a specific "authentic" side dish for any French dishes as most of the dishes are meat oriented, so the cook is free to serve whatever vegetables are in season. With an Entrecôte Bordelaise you'd probably be served french fries most of the time, but there are many other side dishes that would work just as well.
Thanks for the detailed reply. I should clarify that I know that Pauillac lamb is not a recipe or a dish, but a geographic designation of lamb. I was asking what the local recipes for cooking it are. What are the traditional recipes for how they cook lamb in the Bordeaux area. What cuts and how are they prepared...

I figured the Gratin Auvergnat was not authentic, but it did work really well. I have served homemade French fries with Entrecote Bordelaise often in the past and they work really well with the red wine sauce version. To my naive, Canadian eyes, they seemed suited to the more modern presentation. They didn't feel right when I did the really rustic version. I went all out and grilled the steak over dried vine cuttings I got from my wife's grandfather.

Are there any other potato dishes that you would recommend to go with the more rustic preparation that could be considered "authentic"?
 
Last edited:
5,605
481
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Rack of lamb à la Bordelaise:
Turn 1/2 lbs potatoes.
Color porcini mushrooms in olive oil.
Color a rack of lamb in oil and butter in a casserole dish.
Add potatoes and mushrooms to the lamb, cover and cook 1 Hr in a 350F oven.
A few minutes before serving, add a small crushed garlic clove and 3 or 4 tablespoons of "fond brun tomaté".

Leg of Pauillac Lamb
Breaded with breadcrumbs mixed with minced parsley, served with rissolé potatoes, sometimes sliced truffles.

Source: Le Grand Larousse Gastronomique.
 
Last edited:
23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
Rack of lamb à la Bordelaise:
Turn 1/2 lbs potatoes.
Color porcini mushrooms in olive oil.
Color a rack of lamb in oil and butter in a casserole dish.
Add potatoes and mushrooms to the lamb, cover and cook 1 Hr in a 350F oven.
A few minutes before serving, add a small crushed garlic clove and 3 or 4 tablespoons of "fond brun tomaté".

Leg of Pauillac Lamb
Breaded with breadcrumbs mixed with minced parsley, served with rissolé potatoes, sometimes sliced truffles.

Source: Le Grand Larousse Gastronomique.
Thanks so much. Both of those sound great. In response to your advice, I just found them in my own Larousse, which I had just purchased.
 
3,021
913
Joined Jul 13, 2012
Man I haven't turned a potato in years, but I still have a really nice knife for the process.
 
23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
My French friend says that "Pomme Anna" or "Pomme Galette" would also work
Thanks, chefross. I have made a take on Steak Bordelaise with Pomme Anna and it was excellent... I used a recipe from The French Laundry Cookbook called Yabba Dabba Do. It called for a pan roasted Cote de Boeuf, with Bordelaise sauce of course), and sauteed Chanterelles That crafty Thomas Keller, deep down, always following the classic French rules... To an extent.
 
5,605
481
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Pommes Darphin, Pommes Fondant... the possibilities are endless. If you have the Larousse Gastronomique, look up pommes de terre and you should find many recipes. I would favor those who keep the flavor profile simple and not too rich/complex so as to keep the focus on your lamb. I would personally shy away from a side dish involving goat cheese, or blue cheese (or probably any kind of cheese unless it's really subdued).
 
23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
Pommes Darphin, Pommes Fondant... the possibilities are endless. If you have the Larousse Gastronomique, look up pommes de terre and you should find many recipes. I would favor those who keep the flavor profile simple and not too rich/complex so as to keep the focus on your lamb. I would personally shy away from a side dish involving goat cheese, or blue cheese (or probably any kind of cheese unless it's really subdued).
Thanks again. Both are very helpful suggestions I should clarify that the English language version of the Larousse Gastronomique seems to change some of the names. The "Leg of Pauillac Lamb" is renamed the "braised leg of lamb a la bordelaise" and the rack of lamb a la bordelaise is renamed as a "loin of lamb". Also the simple direction of "turning potatoes" has been translated as "cut potatoes into large olive-shaped pieces". Which seems unhelpful, considering that there is also an entry on "turning vegetables" with instructions and photos. By not using the universal, professional term in the English edition, novices do not know to look for the helpful entry on the technique.

In short, I really appreciate you taking the time to write out the recipes from the French version for me. Your translations are actually clearer than the official translations. :)

By the way, I agree I would never use blue cheese with lamb, it would completely overpower the lamb's delicate flavours. I paired the Gratin Auvergnat with the steaks because beef and blue cheese are natural pairings and, on top of that, the steak were dry-aged 50 days, so I expected they would have some blue cheese like funky notes from the aging. I also thought the rustic, wholesome nature of a gratin would be a good fit for the very rustic preparation of the steaks.

By the way, here is a photo of that dinner if anyone is interested. (Apologies for the ego of including my TFL apron in the photo, it was a gift from my wife since she knows I'm a huge Thomas Keller fan.)
 

Attachments

23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
Chateau Haut Bergey 2006 !! Niiiice.

I mean your dishes look great, don't get me wrong... :rofl:
Thank you! Even if my meagre culinary efforts didn't enthraw you, at least you noticed my efforts building a decent cellar of French wines. :lol:

The 2006 Haut Bergey is a good value here in Canada. I'm currently on a medication that doesn't let me drink much... Otherwise I would have opened something really special given how great the food turned out... probably one of the bottles of 2000 Chateau Lanessan I have squirreled away. For recent vintages, I have been primarily collecting Chateau Lagrange - it has been great quality for price, especially en primeur.

For me nothing can beat French wine or food, especially when ate and drank together, so I do my best to cook something to match. Red Bordeaux are my favourite wines (with red Burgundy and red Northern Rhones tied for second). Also love a good Bandol, but they are hard to find here.
 
23
5
Joined Jul 15, 2020
For something more rustic, I tend to go to potatoes sautéed with persillade.
Yummy. That's a classic at home. The equivalent of french fries when you don't want to get the fryer out and make a mess.
Thanks you two! I just looked it up and that is just perfect. That is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for to go with the more rustic version of steak Bordelaise. Frites and Pommes Anna seemed a little too refined and more suited to the more modern red wine sauce version.

It makes total sense given that the classic accompaniment for a simple steak in a North American steakhouse is very similar - some form of "German fried potatoes" or "Steakhouse Hash Browns". Cheers!
 
49
16
Joined Oct 2, 2016
Good morning all,
I have some holiday memories with my aunt Marthe in Beaujolais near Beaune
With the meat she served some vegetables from the kitchen garden or the market, the potatoes were cosidered like a vegetable.
The salad was served after the meat and before the cheese.
 
49
16
Joined Oct 2, 2016
Personally, I would have liked a steak Bordelaise like this:
Pan-fried meat (few grills in French cuisine) in butter (I'm from the north), seasoned with mignonette pepper.
Bordelaise sauce: red wine reduction, shallots, mignonette, shallots, thyme, bay leaf, demi glace. ("monté au beurre" or pieces of marrow but this is not "classic").
Garnish with 5 or 7 whole braised shallots in Bordelaise sauce.
A small salad bowl of green salad with: lettuce, watercress, cucumber and a few green (marais) beans, chive, ... vinaigrette: mustard oil, red wine vinegar).
A small pan of in the steak pan roasted potato .


repertoire bordelaise_LI.jpg repertoire couverture.jpg
 
5,605
481
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Bordelaise sauce: red wine reduction, shallots, mignonette, shallots, thyme, bay leaf, demi glace. ("monté au beurre" or pieces of marrow but this is not "classic").
I would not trust August Escoffier to be the source of the definitive recipe for classic Bordelaise sauce, if there is such a thing. I know that he's got several of the classic recipes from my region completely wrong. Also most of those regional dishes don't have one single authentic "classic" recipe. Within the same family, it's often that you would find the mother having one recipe, one daughter making her own variation, and another sister making a slightly different ones, both claiming to have improved upon the original, which was itself a variation from the mother's neighbor, etc.
 
Top Bottom