Boning Knife and Fillet Knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by cookincam, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. cookincam

    cookincam

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    Hey guys, looking to pick up a new stiff boning knife as well as a fillet knife. Any suggestions on steel choices or brands to go with? I realize that the boning knife is going to run into bones and object more frequently then other knives, so maybe a steel choice thats easier to sharpen on the regular? i know this might sounds like a joke, but has anyone used the Tyler Florence knives? The boning knife seems to have a nice rubber non slip handle, just dont know anything about the quality of those guys....seeing how the have been on a home shopping network previously. BDL any suggestions? 

    Price range up to $75.00 each

    Use Ribs, rack of lamb, leg of lamb, red meat silver cleaning....basics.

    Sharpening up to 4 stage process, whetstones up to ultra fine diamond honing rod.

    -Cameron
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    I've got a few knives I use for heavy duty meat work like trimming and portioning spare ribs, breaking poultry, etc.  One of them is a 10" Victorinox/Forschner which I plan to review very soon.  To make a long story short, I like it quite a bit and recommend it highly as a big meat knife.  Two Cows sells them.

    More generally, Victorinox/Forschner is good quality/excellent value for all meat-cutting specialty knives.  They're used by a LOT of butchers and in the boucher stations of a lot of really good restaurants.  As a practical matter, it's hard to do better.  Sounds like you'd like the Fibrox handles, but I prefer Rosewood.

    I've moved on from the traditional European boning knife (desosseur), and almost always use a petty for "technical" boning, frenching, etc.  You don't lose much in the way of agility and a petty is MUCH easier to sharpen. 

    Japanese specialty "meat" profiles, like honesukes and garasukes are expensive, highly specializid and not particularly well suited for western style cutting.   If you have a particular interest in collecting Japanese knives, why not?  Otherwise, why? 
     
  3. cookincam

    cookincam

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    Thanks for the help again BDL, I actually had the Forschners in my basket along with the Dexter Russels, I do like the look of the Forschners, and now that i know you have had a good experience with them, I will probably go that direction.

    -Cam