Bone broth

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Agreed Jimyra, but as consommé, even Escoffiers, is rarely served unclarified if at all, I think those terms are more interchangeable then "stock" and "broth". [emoji]127864[/emoji]
 
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I'm just wondering if the stock/broth whatever you want to call it is different if using just bones or using meat and bones.  I'm not trying to spark a big debate it's just the recipe I am given calls for bones only and I find that hard to do, do butchers have chicken bones on hand?  And I like a little poached chicken meat for salads and sandwiches so I've never used only bones for broth.
Well, the next chicken you cook, retain the bones and scraps.  That's how I make my chicken stock/consomme/bone broth/whatever they call it.  At the ends of the chicken bone, the leg bones, I tend to take my knife and cut thru the bulge exposing the marrow which is very flavorful and contribute to a perhaps thicker mouthfeel.
 
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Consomme is just clarified stock or broth
Clarified, yes, but also fortified with fresh meat trimmings, as well as fresh vegetables.  The clarification contains egg white as well as ground meat and ground vegetables, right?

  Broth (which is seasoned stock) is not ideal to clarify because of the long simmering times involved, which means while the liquid content has been reduced, the salt content stays the same.  In other words, too salty.

Clear as consommé? 
 
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Yes...exactly. Definition and technique. Was my post not clear?

In any case, koukouvagia, you can find fresh chicken bones for sale in any Asian grocery store, dirt cheap too. No one says you can't make a stock with bones, and then poach a breast or two in the stock before using that stock, right?
 
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This is the first conversation I've seen about bone broth that doesn't define "bone broth" as a stock that is cooked until the bones completely disintegrate.

I deal with a lot of food paranoids and holistic nuts in my line of work, and bone broth has always been defined that way to me within this crowd. When I do a chicken bone broth, I use my pressure cooker to first make a stock with a whole chicken. I remove the chicken after 25 minutes to strip the cooked meat. The carcass goes back in with additional water and the rest of my stock ingredients. It gets pressure cooked again for 45 minutes, then slow cooked overnight. When I open the cooker the next day, the bones are gone. They disintegrate. And the broth is incredibly hearty. It gels completely when cooled. Beef bones take a long time to disintegrate, and won't at all if the bones aren't roasted.
 
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kuan

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So have we or have we not differentiated bone broth from regular broth from stock?
 
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@Brandon ODell
 have you a nutritional breakdown on this (real) bone broth?
I am wondering specifically about the calcium and vitamin D contents.

mimi

I don't have one. I imagine it has a lot of calcium in it, but there probably isn't an accurate way to estimate the nutritional value without sending it to a lab. I haven't heard of any nutrition software that has values for chicken that account for bones and cartilage.
 
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Stock - meat and bones

Broth - meat

Bone broth - mostly bones but with an air of superiority

Consomme - clarified and fortified stock or broth
 
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I
Stock - meat and bones
Broth - meat
Bone broth - mostly bones but with an air of superiority
Consomme - clarified and fortified stock or broth


I've 'splained and ' splained again, but it just isn't getting through.

Broth is any liquid that is ready to eat--salted and seasoned to taste.

If you make a conomme with broth--already salted to taste, and simmer this for 30 minutes, you'd get something you'd have to dilute with water to make it palatable.

Stock, on the other hand has no salt, so it can be reduced to half, oe even more without making it saltier.

This all makes a huge difference if you are making soups and sauces for living

Oh well, at least I got you to acknowledge that consomme is fortified with extra meat as well as clarified. Progress, I suppose...
 
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@foodpump   So it seems to me that in your mind, the distinction between how stocks and broths are salted or reduced (which last I checked, I controlled) is more important than the inclusion or exclusion of bone?  I would consider the presence of gelatin as much more important in defining those 2 liquids, especially considering many of the end-game uses of stock.

I think these points are pretty easily defensible:

stocks and broths are not automatically interchangeable

you can make a consommé from stock

you can make consommé from broth (with care)

a consommé does not have to be fortified at all if the starting liquid is sufficiently flavored

consommé has some sort of clarification step

a stock can NOT be made without bones
 
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@foodpump   I agree with everything you said if you are talking culinary definitions.  That's what I learned and in a kitchen 100% absolutely that is how the terms should be used.

Problem is the Hipsters, and the Ayuverdics before them,  have co-opted the term "bone broth" for different meaning
 
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