Bone broth

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Can anyone explain to me the difference between bone broth and broth made with meat and bone? I'm doing an Ayurvedic detox and the program requires that I have bone broth.

I make chicken stock weekly using a whole chicken. Either a roasted chicken carcass or a whole raw chicken that I poach for an hour, then remove all the meat and place the carcass back in the stockpot to continue cooking. Is this different than bone broth?
 
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You don't understand the difference because you're not a hipster. Bone broth is just the hipster term for stock or broth. Our fore bearers made home made goods by baking and canning and entered them in the county fair to win a blue ribbon and bragging rights. Now what they did to feed the family is called artisanal and you can charge more for it. 

Enjoy your bone broth, however you make it. 
 
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I'm just wondering if the stock/broth whatever you want to call it is different if using just bones or using meat and bones.  I'm not trying to spark a big debate it's just the recipe I am given calls for bones only and I find that hard to do, do butchers have chicken bones on hand?  And I like a little poached chicken meat for salads and sandwiches so I've never used only bones for broth.
 
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The recipe calls for just bones because most people aren't going to sacrifice a whole chicken to make a stock. Bones and meat will make a stronger broth. The way you are doing it is the way I like to do it at home too. I usually go to the asian market and buy what are labeled "tough old hens" if I remember correctly. I simmer the whole birds but still eat the meat when the stock is done.  A stock made with just bones will not be as strong necessarily but in a commercial kitchen the stock is used to strengthen other soups or sauces so a predominate flavor of chicken isn't always wanted.

  Fwiw, back in the days of kings, the amount of meat used to make stocks and glazes was enormous but typically for the kings table because, well, he's the king. In making stock now, adding meat will enhance the end result but isn't necessary. 
 

kuan

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I think you can just remove the thigh and wing sections and take the breast off.  That should give you a good amount of bone and also save the rest of it for other purposes.
 
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Broth is a liquid that is seasoned and ready to eat. Doesn't matter if its made from bones, meat (and or trimmings) or both.

A stock is a liquid that can be converted to a soup, a sauce, or whatever you want, and because of this, no salt is added, and the flavouring profile is fairly neutral.

When you think about the word stock, it means easily converted. i.e. paper stocks are easily converted to cash, they don't need to mature like bonds, retail stores have stock that will be converted to cash.
 
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You don't understand the difference because you're not a hipster. Bone broth is just the hipster term for stock or broth. Our fore bearers made home made goods by baking and canning and entered them in the county fair to win a blue ribbon and bragging rights. Now what they did to feed the family is called artisanal and you can charge more for it. 

Enjoy your bone broth, however you make it. 
 
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Bone broth is made from bare rendering bones with no meat on them. Roasted to a deep brown then simmered for 24 hours for beef.
 
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It just occurred to me that we can now return to making consommé. Or is there another name for that too? 
 
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Y'all missed the Ayurvedic part - this is a healing, medicinal broth.  Bone Broth is used to obtain animal based vitamins, nutrients, etc. without having to eat meat and typically made with beef marrow bones and knuckle bones.  Sorry KK no mention of chicken though I did see a recipe that used a pigs trotter as well as those mentioned.
 
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@Mike9 I'm following a recipe described in a book in which she does give a recipe for chicken bone broth as well as beef. So you think that there is a reason to use only bones and not a whole chicken?
AS mentioned I didn't see a recipe with chicken although I don'e see why you couldn't.  Bone a chicken like Pepin describes for Gallatine and you have a whole carcass for broth and a whole boneless chicken to stuff and roast.

 
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Words have meaning, I like to remember.

Stock - bones included in the preparation

Broth - bones are NOT included in the preparation

Also, a few folks mentioned clarity and other issues.  Except for the bones, both stocks and broths can be white, brown, clarified,cloudy, flavorful, weak, used in soups, sauces, etc.

Bones' big contribution is gelatin, hence body, to the stock.
 
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