blue cheese pasta sauce?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by daniel vianna, Dec 8, 2013.

  1. daniel vianna

    daniel vianna

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    Hi guys how are you?

    So I need some expert help here!

    Sometimes I do a blue cheese pasta sauce but it's not quite right.

    I usually melt  250g of blue cheese with a tetra pack heavy cream 35% and ad a little milk.

    It tastes very good but it's just TOO Heavy

    I've tried to add more milk and flour and cook a little bit, but the flour modifies the taste of the cheese a little bit, corn starch also does the same , although the flour seems to taste a little less heavy.

    what do you guys suggest? I was thinking of cooking the flour and the milk first , make it very thick and then blend together with the melted blue cheese on the cream.

    Thoughts?

    This is not a cream sauce, it's more like a cheese sauce,  I would like to taste like cheese and not milk or cream, but at the same time a little lighter.

    Thanks,

    Daniel
     
  2. beastmasterflex

    beastmasterflex

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    Perhaps try arrowroot as a thickener it has very little taste and thickens much the same as cornstarch, but with a slightly silkier body. Kudzu root starch is also an excellent candidate and I think is superior to arrowroot, but not quite as readily available.

    Kudzu Root

    Must be ground into a powder from the small chunks.
     
  3. deepsouthnyc

    deepsouthnyc

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    If I were to make something like this, I would skip the milk or cream. Use pasta water instead, and a bit of butter. Maybe finish with a bit of creme fraiche.

    Start your pasta, cooking in boiling, lightly salted water and then don't drain it but remove it from the pot, saving the water. Add the pasta to a pan with a bit of butter. Toss the pasta in the pan and add your blue cheese. Toss it a few times while on heat, and begin to add a bit of pasta water to thin it while the cheese melts. Once completely melted and coating the pasta, add some chives and season to taste with salt and whatever else you like.

    This is more of an a la minute execution of the dish that requires you to act quickly once your pasta is out of the water, rather than make a sauce ahead of time.
     
  4. berndy

    berndy

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    I just add blue cheese crumbled into an Alfredo  sauce.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Me too. It's still heavy and rich. That's just right for the strong flavors of a blue cheese. Use it lightly and let the balance come from the smaller amount used. 
     
  6. soesje

    soesje

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    aside from the advice you got from DeepsouthNYC,  you could try a white sauce made into a blue cheese sauce.

    much lighter on the cheese, less heavy.

    and guys, lets be real, alfredo is NOT an sauce.

    the real thing is just butter and parmesan, look it up…..real easy to make! (suggestion have a look at cookgoodfood.com)

    alfredo sauce out of jars/ bottles is nothing like the real thing.
     
  7. daniel vianna

    daniel vianna

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    So how do I do that soesje?
     
  8. durangojo

    durangojo

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    You don't need to add any extra thickener as the cheese and the reduction of the cream will take care of all the thickening in due time. Cheese is the thickener. Adding white wine after your cream has reduced will help to cut the richness in taste as well as sauce thickness. I sweat shallots in white wine, add cream....bring up to just to this side of a boil and reduce....add some of the cheese, reduce, add more white wine and reduce again...i add even more white wine if it needs it or o want a thinner sauce. Next goes in more crumbled bleu cheese just heated through...i want a bit of lumps. bleu cheese/gorgonzola sauce for pasta can be cloyingly rich so i usually balance it with some sort of fresh green crunchy vegetable such as broccoli or sugar snap peas or even frozen peas. The green also adds eyeball appeal..... garnish with toasted pine nuts for even more textural balance. As with all food, it's all about balance......this is a small portion dish for sure.

    joey
     
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  9. soesje

    soesje

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    you don't know how to make a white sauce?
     
  10. helloitslucas

    helloitslucas

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  11. wlong

    wlong

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    Some know white sauce as bechamel.  Maybe that is what got him confused.
     
  12. soesje

    soesje

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  13. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I didn't see that anyone mentioned jars/bottles nor did they say creamy alfredo; but I digress.

    After reading this thread, had to jump into the fray. At work but just threw this together in less time than it took to cook pasta and please don't anybody call the food police but I called it blue veined alfredo. Even though I called it that, it wouldn't come. Finally I was forced to go and get it.

    Pasta 1#

    Cambozola 10 ounces

    Butter 3 ounces

    Pt Reyes Blue 5 ounces

    While pasta was cooking, I put the butter in pan and placed over pilot light. When pasta was cooked. I turned heat off under pasta pan. Turned up heat under butter. Tossed in cambozola, pushed cambozola around. Drained pasta and tossed in pan with cambozola. Add s&p. Turned off heat. Tossed and swung pasta in pan. Added Pt. Reyes Blue. Plated. Ate. Got smiles from coworkers and /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2013
  14. ch3fbrendan

    ch3fbrendan

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    I like to make a burre monte and add in a small amount of blue cheese so to get the taste but not overpower. Could also simply make a brown butter rue add the blue cheese and low fat milk tempered in and simply bring up to a boil once in order to activate the rue. This will make it thicker but not too rich and the nuttiness and slightly sweet flavor from the brown butter will compliment the sharp flavors of the blue cheese. S&P obv also
     
  15. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    From my own experience I can say that the choice of the blue cheese and the amount you use makes all the difference! 

    Best options, as far as I know, are Gorgonzola dolce and (best ever tried) Fourme d'Ambert. There may be a lot of others and I'm guessing that Danish Blue and similar would work perfectly too. Do stay away from the French Roquefort and British Stilton, both will come out very strong in a sauce. Don't get me wrong; I love Roquefort and Stilton.

    Other thing is the concentration of cheese. When using other cheeses like Gruyère, you can put in as much as you like, the sauce will always be tasteful. This is not the case with blue cheese.

    When dissolved in a béchamel, best to use just a little blue cheese.

    When dissolved in cream, that's another question. First off, I never use 100% cream (sauce can split easily due to too high fat content!), but a mixture of milk and cream. Blue cheese does not bind cream as well as when using other cheeses like Gruyère. Again, from my own experience, I use 50/50 cream/milk, dissolve a tbsp. of corn flour in 3 tbsp. of cold milk. Bring the cream/milk mixture to a boil, then add the dissolved corn flour, stir and let boil for a moment; this will stabilize the sauce. Then add just a little blue cheese. Works perfectly without overpowering.