Bleeding on food product is it OK to still use?

OK?


  • Total voters
    13
1
0
Joined Jan 18, 2018
So yesterday my chef was us how to fillet salmon. And she nickied herself on bone bled all over the cutting board and fish, and she said "oh, It's ok just wash it off" what do you guys think? Ok or no, oh ah also she made us use scallops from the frezer but the date ws 1/17/17 is th ok?
 

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
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Sanitation wise no it is not ok but it is a simple question would you want to eat salmon that someone bled all over?
 
1,632
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Joined Aug 21, 2009
I googled the safety of frozen scallops and apparently according to google they can keep indefinitely. Mind you I wonder what the taste and quality of them would be after so long..

The thing with blood and I am sure it is the same whether it is human or animal blood is that listeria spores are known to breed in it and given the right conditions can contaminate the food and cause a listeria outbreak. So in the case of a cut that causes blood to be shed the right thing to do is discard the food immediately and wash and sanitize the untensils involved as well as the work area. Anything less than that would be negligent in my opinion.
 
31
13
Joined Jan 18, 2018
So yesterday my chef was us how to fillet salmon. And she nickied herself on bone bled all over the cutting board and fish, and she said "oh, It's ok just wash it off" what do you guys think? Ok or no, oh ah also she made us use scallops from the frezer but the date ws 1/17/17 is th ok?
Hi,
Reading this scares me. There are certain sicknesses that can be transferred through bodily fluids (Hep. B for example). The simplest form of not protecting your self (think touching dirty cutlery with a paper cut on your hands and no gloves) can make the difference in personal safety.
i don't mean to be "extreme" with my reply, but honestly if you ate it, how would you feel finding this out?

As far as the scallops go, i agree with Ieeniek.
 
2,999
538
Joined May 5, 2010
Back in the day, the Chef would wrap a cloth around the cut, wash off the blood and continue on. Now-a-days the entire HACCP team has to be called, all production stopped and the area sanitized before work can resume.
 
148
24
Joined Aug 23, 2008
Ah no! Why do you think hospitals, corrections and many other organizations spend so much time on universal precautions?
 
31
13
Joined Jan 18, 2018
Back in the day, the Chef would wrap a cloth around the cut, wash off the blood and continue on. Now-a-days the entire HACCP team has to be called, all production stopped and the area sanitized before work can resume.
Haha. Yes but they also used to think Jellied Salmon Loaf was a good idea too.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Jun 11, 2001
Serious, as the only professional chef forum on the internet, we have a vote yes/no if its ok to bleed in the food you are serving???
Really? Is this the only professional chef forum on the internet?
 
174
48
Joined Feb 8, 2015
Really? Is this the only professional chef forum on the internet?
Maybe there is more? But years ago when I had a real question this was the site that popped up. Still lost in the Caribbean and have never owned a smart phone. I'm out of the loop
 
567
202
Joined May 25, 2015
I would say that the same is also true of any other bodily fluid like sweat, saliva, runny nose and sneezing on the food.
 
166
42
Joined Aug 26, 2016
In my opinion your chef is moronic. You never do anything like that...ever. Has your chef been tested for HIV?
 
2,004
522
Joined Oct 31, 2012
Before I answer this seemingly Either/or question, I'd like the OP to come back and clarify their rhetoric. "nicked her finger on bone" and "bled all over the fish and cutting board. You can't nick a finger to the bone. Either you nick the finger or you cut your finger clear to the bone. A nick doesn't bleed so much right away. A bone deep cut doesn't lend itself to standing around discussing food safety.
Did the chef really bleed "all over" or are we really talking about a drop or two?
I think the clarification is important. As a veteran of too many cuts, both minor and severe, I know the first thing I do is Swear and pull my hand away from everything immediately and wrap it in something. Then I wait for the shock to pass and then inspect my injury to see if I'll need stitches. Then I check to see if I've bled on anything.
As I usually manage to achieve nicking my finger while cutting an onion, if I notice a drop or two of blood on the onions, I'll throw them out. If I cut myself badly enough to potentially "bleed all over", the finger is already bleeding through the towel or apron or whatever is wrapped around it. I'm not letting it bleed all over anything.
So anyway...,
 
53
12
Joined Dec 28, 2017
Before I answer this seemingly Either/or question, I'd like the OP to come back and clarify their rhetoric. "nicked her finger on bone" and "bled all over the fish and cutting board. You can't nick a finger to the bone. Either you nick the finger or you cut your finger clear to the bone. A nick doesn't bleed so much right away. A bone deep cut doesn't lend itself to standing around discussing food safety.
Did the chef really bleed "all over" or are we really talking about a drop or two?
I think the clarification is important. As a veteran of too many cuts, both minor and severe, I know the first thing I do is Swear and pull my hand away from everything immediately and wrap it in something. Then I wait for the shock to pass and then inspect my injury to see if I'll need stitches. Then I check to see if I've bled on anything.
As I usually manage to achieve nicking my finger while cutting an onion, if I notice a drop or two of blood on the onions, I'll throw them out. If I cut myself badly enough to potentially "bleed all over", the finger is already bleeding through the towel or apron or whatever is wrapped around it. I'm not letting it bleed all over anything.
So anyway...,
I think op means his chef cut her finger on a fish bone, although it would take extra effort to cut yourself deep enough to bleed all over the fish and the cutting board with a fish bone.
 

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