Blanching bones

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by 100folds, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. 100folds

    100folds

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    How many out there has tried a stock where they have blanched the bones and a stock where you haven't. Is there a difference? I don't think you loose flavor because there isn't much flavor in the bones but you may loose some gelatin. How many think that it's that important and does it really make a difference?
     
  2. dano1

    dano1

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    what kind of stock?
     
  3. 100folds

    100folds

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    Well, traditionally you are only suppose to do it in a white stock or chicken stock but recently I've heard of Chefs doing in Brown stocks and they say that it creates a cleaner tasting stock. My problem with is that;
    first: you could have to dry the bones before browning them because they wouldn't brown as well if they are moist
    Second: I would think that you loose at least some of the flavor or at the very least, the gelatin which gives body to your stock.
    If you look up in escoffier, he doesn't mention anything about blanching the bones so who thought it was the right thing to do and why? I understand that it removes the impurities but you can combine that step when you skim off the scum.
    Just wondering if it's that important.
    An example of a Chef we all might know is Thomas Keller. But lately I have heard of Chefs everywhere do this to do both stocks. What is your opinion? I am interseted.
     
  4. jbyl

    jbyl

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    In my opinion, for the BEST stock, it should be done. If youve never blanched the bones before, do it. A lot of crap, for lack of a better word, comes out of the bones. The bones look so much cleaner. But thats for the best stock. To me, it doesnt seem like most sauces used in most restaurants make sauces that need a stock that clean. Another thing to remember about Keller, his sauces go through a chinois 20 or more times. He says until no sediments remain in the chinois. Keller is a perfectionist, and i love him for it. But it doesnt seem like most places need to go to that extreme. I've tasted good stocks that havent been blanched. Just my opinion.
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Their is no definitive end all answer to your question.

    For white stock I wash the bones,I don't do this with brown stock, (which I use ankle and shank cuts) I think when we talk about stock we need to be patient,always start with cold water, and add your aromatics only after you have come to a simmer. Never stir your stock, and let it simmer ever so gently to melt the connective tissue and collagen which is what gives your stock body (gelatin). I always strain my stock through a chinios set in a china cap lined with rinsed cheesecloth.If you are worried about a clear stock, chill it properly,degrease it and make a clarification mixture (lean ground meat, egg whites, mire poix, tomato etc) and clarify it.
     
  6. redace1960

    redace1960

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    i think you lose body, flavor and food value by blanching. i used to; no more.
    if you want clarity, strain, strain, strain. if you want lightness,adjust that in the construction stage-or just add water!
    ruhlman witnessed upwards of FORTY strainings of a single stock in kellermans kitchen. the man is a GOD.
     
  7. 100folds

    100folds

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    I think that cape chef is right in that stocks need patience and knowledge of what is going on. But my question was, has anyone ever noticed a difference in flavor between the different methods. Apperance can be changed for the most part with a raft. I want to know if there is a noticeable improvemnet in flavor when blanching the bones. Is it worth our time or is it a step that we can avoid or skip.
     
  8. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Flavor is removed when you blanch the bones.It is not necessary.
     
  9. shahar

    shahar

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    This issue represent one of the issues that really bug me!

    I'm all for extra processes when it make sense. AKA, shows on the plate.
    Many chef put too much god **** time in things that are going to be lost. When it matters I'll be a perfectionist, but scientificly. Try it and see if the difference goes all the way.
    What I mean is, does the extra steps make a difference in the end? Are they cost effective?

    With this the question isn't what the stock end up tasting like, but the sauces. The stock is going to be mixed with more veg, tomato paste, spices, it's going the reduce, maybe meet some starch.

    If it makes a difference. Yeah! But don't waste your time on the wrong things!
     
  10. 100folds

    100folds

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    I agree so I did some tests. I used both methods for both brown and white stock. The brown stock lost flavor and you're not suppose to do it there anyways. The white stock tasted cleaner and was less oily. I will use it for my white stocks from here on in but forget the brown. I also don't think it's necessary to strain my stocks 20 times like some chefs. It seems a little redundent.
     
  11. redace1960

    redace1960

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    good for you for giving a ****! :bounce: cant say i agree with you 100 percent but i'm impressed you care enough to make the trial. if you're going to be picky about anything, thats the thing to be picky about imho. you just go on with your bad self!