'Blacksmith finish' on Japanese Knives - why?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by bonesetter, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    Humour a knife novice and tell me why J-knives have the KU, blacksmith's finish on them. I know it's meant to look rustic and such, but really, why not polished finish, or some kind of better finish?

    I bought a Kurosaki gyuto and showed it to my pal who has always used Sabs and he said if that (about mine) that if that was a car, it would be called an unfinished project

    OK, he was ribbing me a little as we prefer different knife styles, but I can see his point
     
  2. ordo

    ordo

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    From chefknivestogo website:

    Kurouchi is not a type of knife but rather a traditional, rustic finish. Kurouchi roughly translates as blacksmith’s finish. Kurouchi knives retain the scaly residue left from the forging process. The finish reduces reactivity on carbon steel knives, reduces the cost of production, and give the knife a very characterful, rustic aesthetic prized by many knife enthusiasts. Kurouchi finishes vary widely in appearance, uniformity, and durability. Rarely do pictures do these finishes justice as they have a very complex look and feel to them.
     
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    It costs less to produce and is less upkeep.  I wouldn't say they are all "leftover" from forging.  It can be placed on very deliberately.  Some are flat, some have more texture. 

    Polished knives are more upkeep if you want to keep them looking that way (and actually use them not just for display).
     
  4. foody518

    foody518

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    Adding onto the cost of production point- the KU knives I have don't have the top 1/3 of the blade face ground perfectly flat. But yes the finish will eventually wear away and I'll have to figure out if I will want to do anything about it at that point.
    Often times if you see the same knife offered in KU and polished, there will be a price difference. There could very well be other factors that go into the price difference, but the KU vs polished finish almost definitely seems to be a big part of it.
     
  5. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    Thanks, but it still doesn't get past the knife looking only half-finished. The KU is a matter of taste I suppose

    Reactivity - well the KU wears off anyway, and if you look at polished carbon that patina's and enthusiasts like the colours and look of that finish. Each to their own I suppose

    Some, Takeda immediately comes to mind, are particularly rough, and although I've not used one that rough or 'pitted' I can't help being uneasy about hygiene 

    Was there ever an attempt made to stop knives of this kind sold looking - and smelling - straight from the forge?
     
  6. foody518

    foody518

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    Similar to you I think, just can't bring myself to like the ones that look pitted or spotty from the start.

    I imagine with a typical home usage, the KU might hold up well for a few years. I'll be sad if I start to see mine going anytime soon. On the hygienic point, If you notice yours start to go you might make the decision to strip it all off then and there.

    Haven't noticed any smells OOTB with mine. In fact, I think the strongest smell I noticed of my purchases, oddly enough, was the handle of my Tanaka VG-10 nakiri which reminded me of grilling fumes.

    Could be totally off on this, but I want to say that I've read before on KU not being a very common traditionally standard aesthetic. The influx of how much we see of it could be playing on the western hype and sentiment of how "rustic" it looks. If traditionally you weren't supposed to see the knives that prepared your meal, that'd go doubly for a KU knife.

    By the way, how are you enjoying your Kurosaki?
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    I personally think it's all aesthetics and tradition.

    For instance, now a tradition is starting with people who restore older vehicles.  When they find them with a really nice aged patina they won't repaint. They will clear coat protect the patina.. I also think the origin of the knife which is in a rustic part of Japan represents the knife's use. I believe it was made for utility use. I don't believe that now a days it's done because it's cheaper, that just goes against most of Japanese philosophy. A lot of these knife processes were handed down  from the older sword makers which had to pump out swords for protection. I'm sure their swords were made the same way and the tradition just stuck. The swords just had to have a hard sharp edge to lop of someones head. :>)
     
  8. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    There is a big split between pro and home cook in japan.   Professionals have their knives in sight of customers and the mindset is that any patina is dirty.  Likely they clean and polish their knives at the end of every shift with daikon radish.

    Home cooks probably are using german stainless steel santokus to be honest
     
  9. foody518

    foody518

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    I'm more inclined to think that keeping knives (and swords! ) polished and impeccable looking seems to be more in line with tradition. And I guess a better way to put the cost factor is not that the main motivation is corners are being cut to be cheaper, but that how would this KU finished knife garner the same price point as the polished one? Perception of cleanliness or possibly "quality" plays into that. I haven't browsed and run into a KU usuba or true chisel ground KU yanagiba yet :p

    Edit- panini I think I understand what you're saying better now. Those knives which are from a more farming/otherwise rustic region within their Japan, representing their origins?
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
  10. atatax

    atatax

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    next knife i can justify getting, might be Kurouchi. I feel like even if i worked somewhere where customers saw it, that the finish would look seasoned, not dirty to them.
     
  11. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    Briefly, and must say my kitchen at home has been unusually quiet over the last few days, so haven't had chance to cut all that much with it, but so far it seems OK. 

    Nothing mind blowing so far in any respect. I've seen it referred to as a beast, but I can't see it - seems very tame and friendly so far.

    I'm really not sure if I'm a fan of the KU type finish for a start. I now have two with this look, the other being a Tojiro ITK I bought some time as a full carbon white taster and sharpening practice. The Kurosaki is all round nicer for sure, with a grind properly done but so far not a world apart. Both have almost an identical profile and almost same heights. I haven't sharpened the Kurosaki yet, and the OOTB paper cutting I would just about give a 6 to. As said used it very little so all that may change, and indeed I hope to like this knife more with time

    The most impressive knife I have bought so far is the Kramer Zwilling 10" Chef's. Such a pleasure, capable and doesn't balk at anything

    Others in the quiver

    Kohestu AS 240 Western

    CarboNext 240

    Konosuke HD 240

    Loads of other beaters Victorinox, boner, cleaver etc
     
  12. ones

    ones

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    Back to the KU issue - what about food release ? I assume that a Takeda with such an extensive KU aspect to it would have that advantage ?
     
  13. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Grind has much bigger impact on food release
     
  14. foody518

    foody518

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    I did almost the same thing with buying a Yamashin then receiving a Moritaka AS as a gift! In fact if not for the Moritaka I probably would have caved and bought a Kurosaki by now. He looks like he's putting out some great stuff. Hope you've gotten a bit more time to use the Kurosaki by now. How does it look like behind the edge?
    I haven't been wowed by that many of my knives' OOTB edges, and the ones that have seemed the keenest were largely brittle edges that I've had to sharpen out anyways. And I'm getting to the point where I can tell that even with my novice sharpening skills, that I can put on a better edge than I'm being given. Just have to get over the stray grit scratch marks on the blade face. Got an Ikazuchi 240mm from Jon last week and I forgot to ask him to sharpen it before sending it out (still kicking myself for that one). Got the knife, wheel ground edge, and just took a deep breath, took out the stones, and went at it. Definitely is cutting more to how I want that knife to cut now. :cool:
    Maybe the Kurosaki will come alive with a fresh stone edge! :D

    Edit- the addition on the Ikazuchi
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2016
  15. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    It's pretty standard practice for Japanese knives to be supplied with a mediocre, almost unfinished edge and it's down to the end user to put their edge on. Some smiths, Takeda and Teruyasu Fujiwara are two of the obvious names which come to mind who supply super sharp edged blades OOTB. If you're going for some of the more mass produced knives, eg Yaxell, Shun VG-10 stuff they tend to be decently sharp. I've just received a Sakai Takayuki hammered damascus Nakiri which is properly sharp

    I have now sharpened the Kurosaki and it it is cutting very well now. I'm liking it more now. It's a knife you don't notice too much which to me is a good sign (in most things)

    If you're getting grit scratching your blade face it sounds like your angle is too steep 

    Is your Ikazuchi the stainless clad one - looks nice. Has it got a tiny bit of back belly?
     
  16. foody518

    foody518

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    Understood. I think one of the best actually usable past a few minutes OOTB edges I've gotten has actually come from my Tojiro DP o_O

    Great to hear on the Kurosaki!

    So what happened was that I still haven't fully understood how much water to use with this new splash and go stone I got...and the excess water carried small amounts of swarf or stone grit up along the blade face. And then I did a stupid thing while on my 500 stone trying to get the bevels in better shape since I don't like trying to match the bevel of the waterwheel grinder - kept way too much mud on after flattening and had a slight suction effect on a few strokes while trying to drop the angle to widen the bevel, which again carried abrasives up onto the blade face. :( It's stray scratches. I know what you're referring to, and I did that to one of my first knives, but it's not that.

    Yep, stainless clad, with the cool cladding line. Feels great, definitely the lightest of my gyutos, cuts very easily. Not sure what you're referring to as back belly, can you explain? I'll check as soon as I understand your meaning.
     
  17. foody518

    foody518

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    Lighting doesn't capture it super well, but I've got slim horizontal scratches like that streaking along the blade face because I was dumb while the stones were out.
     
  18. bonesetter

    bonesetter

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    I've scratched a couple of blade surfaces, and gouged a stone when I started out. Heck, I even managed to drop a King combo and crack it across its width. All part of learning, and why I practiced on my cheap knife and stone set first :)

    Carrying on the blacksmith finish - will the smell ever go?

    Also, and I suppose this should be the topic of another thread, but the standard wa handles with plastic ferrules were a big surprise to me. I mean its like a piece of super cheap dowling rod stuck on the end. And this on a $300 knife

    Combined with the half finished forge smell blacksmith finish I just don't get it 
     
  19. foody518

    foody518

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    Similar experiences here, except the stone dropping. I did manage to accidentally bang it on something which chipped out a small chunk though...
    I suppose I'll have to smell my KU finish knives when I get home tonight.. I really didn't feel like the smell was that big a deal. Or are you referring to the smells generated by the soft iron cladding?
    Holy smokes, which knife did you get? The KU Kurosakis I see online seem to pretty much all have rosewood handles with a black pakkawood ferrule. That's perplexing to hear about.
     
  20. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

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    Bump!

    Do you have a VG-10 Nakiri or one of their other stainless nakiri's? I have a VG-10 Takayuki hammered damascus knife. It was one of my first japanese knife purchases. I'm not too big of a fan of that knife anymore and my wife uses it as her main knife now.

    I am wondering if anybody has their AEB-L or other more expensive damascus knives and if they are any better? 

    I have a 240mm Sakai Takayuki Wa-handled Grand Chef in AEB-L and it is very thin and sharpens like a dream. It really is my favorite knife I own and has been a crazy workhorse knife. It is my watermelon knife! I'm kinda curious about their $4-500 knives in silver-3 and other AEB-L knives they make.  
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2017