Blackbox

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by chefteldanielle, Oct 26, 2001.

  1. chefteldanielle

    chefteldanielle

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    I get to do my final exam and that includes a blackbox test.
    I will be given certain ingredients and must complete a 5 course meal in 2 hours..
    Since Iam going to the Cordon bLeu..French cooking school I must have 2 small sauces in my meal.
    My first will be a vinaigrette for my salad and my question is..
    Which classical small sauce goes with fish/chicken/ beef so that I can concentrate on that sauce in my practice.
    Thank you in advance
    Danielle
     
  2. isa

    isa

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    The first thing that comes to mind is tomato sauce in one form or another. Might not be what you had in mind though...
     
  3. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    Bernaise or Buerre Blanc are basic enough and classic accompaniments to sauce any of those protein sources. They also lend themselves quite nicely to simple variations, thus adding distinction to your creations.
    Good Luck
    May the Kitchen God smile on you.
     
  4. isa

    isa

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    That sounds a lot better than tomato sauce. :lips:
     
  5. chefteldanielle

    chefteldanielle

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    Actually I had a tomato sauce in mind.. like a creole sauce.. It should go with everything.. Ofcourse I would use fish fumee to make it for fish..
    What do you think..
    Darn french!!!
    Just kidding
    Danielle
     
  6. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    I love creole sauce-great with chicken & obviously shrimp, but can overpower delicate fish. Might be strange with beef, depending on the cut.
    Not to beat a dead horse, but I've had an absolutely delicious tomato buerre blanc with capers served over fish or chicken.
     
  7. mofo1

    mofo1

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    Why not do both in one sauce? Sauce Choron. Bearnaise with tomato whisked in at the end. Never made it, but it always sounded good to me.:lips:
     
  8. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi daneille,

    Althought Beurre blanc is not a "mother" sauce,it certainly can be treated as so as far as making compounds from it.

    For the fish a champange/french tarragon buerre blanc.perhaps with the chicken a vermouth/chive blossem beurre blanc and with the beef a beurre rouge folding in a touch of glace de viande at the end with the butter. you can even fold in a touch of a high quility blue vein cheese with the beef.

    I wish you the best of luck
    cc
    :chef:
     
  9. chefteldanielle

    chefteldanielle

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    Thank you all..
    keep those ideas coming please..
    Danielle:bounce:
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Danielle,

    I don't think vinaigrette is considered a small sauce. I would try to show a few things in your exam.

    1) Perfect cuts, preferably a variety of cuts with a variety of vegetables as you have learned. Try not to repeat the same garnishes or vegetables in different parts of the meal.

    2) Sound technique. In otherwords, make sure your brown is the correct brown, don't overdust your meat, dry your lettuce properly.

    3) Show a little bit (not too much) ingenuity. Perhaps a third sauce derived from a mother sauce but not a classical sauce, or a chicken blanquette instead of a veal blanquette.

    4) Proper proportions. 6oz of protein for the entree, 8-10oz for the whole dinner is considered just right these days.

    In general, if you're going to do something, make sure you do it well. Demonstrate as many basic cooking skills as you can. If you're going to filet a sole see if you can work in a quick stock from the bones.

    Don't forget your names and what they mean. Since it's classical, the names are very important in the sense that they name the entree, specify the garnishes, and have historical significance. For example, you cannot have Chateaubriand without potatoes chateau!

    Good luck!

    Kuan
     
  11. coolj

    coolj

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    I might be out in left field with this one, but what about a hard sauce, like a tarragon or herb butter or maybe a citrus butter, but I'm not sure how well that would go with beef.